erythroblast


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Related to erythroblast: monoblast

erythroblast

 [ĕ-rith´ro-blast]
a term originally used for any type of nucleated erythrocyte, but now usually limited to one of the nucleated precursors of an erythrocyte, i.e. one of the developmental stages in the erythrocytic series, in contrast to a megaloblast. In this usage, it is called also normoblast.
basophilic erythroblast a nucleated precursor in the erythrocytic series, preceding the polychromatophilic erythroblast and following the proerythroblast; the cytoplasm is basophilic, the nucleus is large with clumped chromatin, and the nucleoli have disappeared. Called also basophilic normoblast.
orthochromatic erythroblast see normoblast.
polychromatic erythroblast (polychromatophilic erythroblast) see normoblast.

e·ryth·ro·blast

(ĕ-rith'rō-blast),
Originally, a term denoting all forms of human red blood cells containing a nucleus, both pathologic (that is, megaloblastic) and normal (for example, normoblastic). The pathologic or megaloblastic series is observed in pernicious anemia in relapse. The term megaloblast is also used to indicate the first generation of cells in the red blood cell series that can be distinguished morphologically; hence, with this usage, megaloblast denotes both a normal and an abnormal cell. In the erythroblastic series of maturation four stages of development can be recognized: 1) proerythroblast, 2) basophilic erythroblast, 3) polychromatic erythroblast, and 4) orthochromatic erythroblast. In the megaloblastic series of maturation, stages similar to those found in the normoblastic series are seen: 1) promegaloblast, 2) basophilic megaloblast, 3) polychromatic megaloblast, and 4) orthochromatic megaloblast. In the normal series of maturation, after loss of the nucleus, young erythrocytes are called reticulocytes; these cells may be recognized with supravital stains such as brilliant cresyl blue; ultimately the reticulocytes become erythrocytes, or mature red blood cells.
Synonym(s): erythrocytoblast
[erythro- + G. blastos, germ]

erythroblast

/eryth·ro·blast/ (ĕ-rith´ro-blast) originally, any nucleated erythrocyte, but now more generally used to designate a nucleated precursor cell in the erythrocytic series (q.v.). Four developmental stages in the series are recognized: the proerythroblast (q.v.), the basophilic e., in which the cytoplasm is basophilic, the nucleus is large with clumped chromatin, and the nucleoli have disappeared; the polychromatophilic e., in which the nuclear chromatin shows increased clumping and the cytoplasm begins to acquire hemoglobin and takes on an acidophilic tint; and the orthochromatic e., the final stage before nuclear loss, in which the nucleus is small and ultimately becomes a blue-black, homogeneous, structureless mass.

erythroblast

(ĭ-rĭth′rə-blăst′)
n.
Any of the nucleated cells normally found only in bone marrow that develop into erythrocytes.

e·ryth′ro·blas′tic adj.

erythroblast

[erith′rəblast′]
a nucleated immature form of a red blood cell found only in bone marrow.

e·ryth·ro·blast

(ĕ-rith'rō-blast)
The first generation of cells in the red blood cell series that can be distinguished from precursor endothelial cells. In normal maturation, four stages of development can be recognized: pronormoblast, basophilic normoblast, polychromatic normoblast, and orthochromatic normoblast.
[erythro- + G. blastos, germ]

erythroblast

A primitive, nucleated red blood cell. A stage in the development of the normal non-nucleated red cell (ERYTHROCYTE) found in the circulating blood.

erythroblast

a nucleated cell occurring in bone marrow as the first identifiable stage of red blood cell formation; See ERYTHROCYTE.

Loevit,

Moritz, Austrian pathologist, 1851-1918.
Loevit cell - originally a term denoting all forms of human red blood cells containing a nucleus, both pathologic and normal. Synonym(s): erythroblast

erythroblast

bone marrow precursor of an erythrocyte

e·ryth·ro·blast

(ĕ-rith'rō-blast)
The first generation of cells in the red blood cell series that can be distinguished from precursor endothelial cells.
[erythro- + G. blastos, germ]

erythroblast

originally, any nucleated erythrocyte, but now more generally used to designate the nucleated precursor from which an erythrocyte develops.

basophilic erythroblast
orthochromatic erythroblast
polychromatophilic erythroblast
References in periodicals archive ?
B, The endothelial nature of the cells is confirmed by erythroblast transformation-specific transcription factor (ERG) staining.
Morphologic hallmarks of erythroblasts are per se specific, but may also be observed as single abnormalities in other disorders of erythropoiesis.
SOX17 Regulates Conversion of Human Fibroblasts into Endothelial Cells and Erythroblasts via DeDifferentiation into CD34 Progenitor Cells.
CALR expression in erythroblasts and granulocytes is also downregulated from [CD34.
Contract notice: Delivery of reagents, control materials, consumables to perform the assays, blood cell count with differential white blood cells for 5 min population, marking erythroblasts and reticulocytes (.
Radioprotective effects of the thiols GSH and WR-2721 against X-ray-induction of micronuclei in erythroblasts.
These fetal cells include erythroblasts, trophoblasts, granulocytes, and lymphocytes, all of which are nucleated and could theoretically be amenable to cytogenetic analysis.
In adults, HLA-G is found in the cornea, thymus, pancreas, endothelial cell precursors, and erythroblasts [78].
We also found rounded immature erythrocytes (Figures 1A-1D) similar to basophilic erythroblasts (rubricytes) that had a very thin basophilic cytoplasm forming a small ring around the nucleus, which was generally round (Figure 1A).