erythroblast


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Related to erythroblast: monoblast

erythroblast

 [ĕ-rith´ro-blast]
a term originally used for any type of nucleated erythrocyte, but now usually limited to one of the nucleated precursors of an erythrocyte, i.e. one of the developmental stages in the erythrocytic series, in contrast to a megaloblast. In this usage, it is called also normoblast.
basophilic erythroblast a nucleated precursor in the erythrocytic series, preceding the polychromatophilic erythroblast and following the proerythroblast; the cytoplasm is basophilic, the nucleus is large with clumped chromatin, and the nucleoli have disappeared. Called also basophilic normoblast.
orthochromatic erythroblast see normoblast.
polychromatic erythroblast (polychromatophilic erythroblast) see normoblast.

e·ryth·ro·blast

(ĕ-rith'rō-blast),
Originally, a term denoting all forms of human red blood cells containing a nucleus, both pathologic (that is, megaloblastic) and normal (for example, normoblastic). The pathologic or megaloblastic series is observed in pernicious anemia in relapse. The term megaloblast is also used to indicate the first generation of cells in the red blood cell series that can be distinguished morphologically; hence, with this usage, megaloblast denotes both a normal and an abnormal cell. In the erythroblastic series of maturation four stages of development can be recognized: 1) proerythroblast, 2) basophilic erythroblast, 3) polychromatic erythroblast, and 4) orthochromatic erythroblast. In the megaloblastic series of maturation, stages similar to those found in the normoblastic series are seen: 1) promegaloblast, 2) basophilic megaloblast, 3) polychromatic megaloblast, and 4) orthochromatic megaloblast. In the normal series of maturation, after loss of the nucleus, young erythrocytes are called reticulocytes; these cells may be recognized with supravital stains such as brilliant cresyl blue; ultimately the reticulocytes become erythrocytes, or mature red blood cells.
Synonym(s): erythrocytoblast
[erythro- + G. blastos, germ]

erythroblast

(ĭ-rĭth′rə-blăst′)
n.
Any of the nucleated cells normally found only in bone marrow that develop into erythrocytes.

e·ryth′ro·blas′tic adj.

e·ryth·ro·blast

(ĕ-rith'rō-blast)
The first generation of cells in the red blood cell series that can be distinguished from precursor endothelial cells. In normal maturation, four stages of development can be recognized: pronormoblast, basophilic normoblast, polychromatic normoblast, and orthochromatic normoblast.
[erythro- + G. blastos, germ]

erythroblast

A primitive, nucleated red blood cell. A stage in the development of the normal non-nucleated red cell (ERYTHROCYTE) found in the circulating blood.

erythroblast

a nucleated cell occurring in bone marrow as the first identifiable stage of red blood cell formation; See ERYTHROCYTE.

Loevit,

Moritz, Austrian pathologist, 1851-1918.
Loevit cell - originally a term denoting all forms of human red blood cells containing a nucleus, both pathologic and normal. Synonym(s): erythroblast

e·ryth·ro·blast

(ĕ-rith'rō-blast)
The first generation of cells in the red blood cell series that can be distinguished from precursor endothelial cells.
[erythro- + G. blastos, germ]
References in periodicals archive ?
We studied the methylation profiles of erythroblasts and other blood cells (neutrophils, B-lymphocytes, and T-lymphocytes) and tissues (liver, lung, colon, small intestines, pancreas, adrenal gland, esophagus, heart, brain, and placenta) from the BLUEPRINT Project and the Roadmap Epigenomics Project and methylomes generated by our group (18-20, 23).
The increased iron levels in the BM of Tfr2 KO animals could trigger EryA erythroblasts production, but the increased apoptosis finally normalizes RBC output.
Figure 3 shows the morphological characteristics of erythrocytes, erythroblasts, lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes, eosinophils, special granulocytic cells (SGC) or PAS-positive granular leukocytes (PAS-GL) and thrombocytes in the blood of O.
While a greater number of cells in cross-flow filtration remained within DMSO fibres, dead-end filtration promoted a similar filtration rate for both fibres (Figure 5(e)), and [CD235a.sup.+] enucleated and nucleated erythroblasts could be found in the process of filtration through transverse sections of DMSO fibres (Figure 5(f)).
The lesional cells are positive for cytokeratin (B) and erythroblast transformation-specific transcription factor (ERG) (C) and demonstrate loss of nuclear integrase interactor 1 (INI1) (D) (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification X200 [A]; original magnifications X200 [B through D]).
There is no report yet on downregulation of SOX6 to induce [gamma]-globin expression in human erythroblasts derived from [beta]-thalassemia major.
Erythroblast Morphology Polypoid Basophilic Cells Karyorrhexis Stippling Type Of CDA 1 Nil 2 3 CDA Type II 2 4 3 5 CDA Type I 3 Nil 2.5 2 CDA Type II 4 Nil 2 2 CDA Type II 5 Nil 2.5 2 CDA Type II 6 3 4 6 CDA Type I 7 Nil 2 2 CDA Type II
ERG immunostain, a member of the erythroblast transformation-specific (ETS) family of transcription factors, is responsible for regulating endothelial cell differentiation, angiogenesis, and expression of several endothelial-specific antigens.
(8) employed an intensive method of assessing marrow iron in 303 children (aged 6 to 60 months) assessing iron in marrow fragments, in macrophages around fragments, and in erythroblasts. Fragment and macrophage iron reflect iron stores while iron in the erythroblast is indicative of utilizable iron which is diminished in functional iron deficiency.
The maturation into early erythroblast cells was indicated by [CD71.sup.high]/[Ter119.sup.-] expression (1.4% KO versus 2.7% NTC), and late erythroblasts cells expressed [CD71.sup.high]/[Ter119.sup.+] (2.3% KO versus 4.9% NTC).
The HLA-G locus presents a tissue-restricted expression pattern, being expressed in physiological conditions only in certain tissues such as trophoblast at the maternal-fetal interface, thymus, cornea, pancreas, proximal nail matrix, erythroblast, and mesenchymal stem cells [1,11-18].