erratic

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Related to erratically: decisively, tumultuously

er·rat·ic

(ĕ-rat'ik),
1. Synonym(s): eccentric (1)
2. Denoting symptoms that vary in intensity, frequency, or location.
[L. erro, pp. erratus, to wander]

erratic

(ĭ-răt′ĭk) [L. errare, to wander]
Having an unpredictable or fluctuating course or pattern; wandering.

er·rat·ic

(ĕ-rat'ik)
1. Synonym(s): eccentric (1) .
2. Denoting symptoms that vary in intensity, frequency, or location.
[L. erro, pp. erratus, to wander]
References in periodicals archive ?
A Northumbria Police spokesperson said: "At around 12.30pm on Easter Monday police received a report that a vehicle was being driven erratically in Gateshead.
police stopped the vehicle which was driving erratically and talked to the driver who seemed impaired by alcohol.
Prosecutor Justin Espie said on July 27 at 11pm police saw her car being driven erratically. It was braking hard, its lights were flashing and she parked in the middle of the road.
Earlier, a police spokesman said: "At approximately 12.30am officers on patrol in Eastgate Street saw a car being driven erratically, it continued down Barton Street and was stopped in Derby Road.
WHY are moths always attracted to lightbulbs when they're switched on, and why do they flutter erratically around them?
LEOMINSTER - A 54-year-old man was arrested Wednesday on his fifth drunken-driving charge after he was reportedly seen driving erratically on Route 2, almost sideswiping other vehicles, according to District Court documents.
These currents flow erratically, not in steady patterns making them dangerous even to the most experienced swimmers.
In pursuit of an erratically held utopian ideal of universal equality, these tribunals routinely override certain Charter rights such as freedom of speech and religion.
If your forklift lifts erratically, it probably has a hydraulic leak.
Our country is shaken erratically like a group of winos during
Though not widely known outside Madrid, Luis Salaberria is hardly a newcomer; he has been exhibiting for fifteen years, albeit erratically. Throughout this period, his work has been consistent in its use of a personal imagery even while undergoing a noticeable evolution.
Jasperse and Mapp acted erratically. During a section of jumping with fixed, manic expressions, the two evoked the ideas of psychologist Silvan Tomkins, who categorized the innate, biological, visible signs of emotion.