erotogenic


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erotogenic

 [ĕ-rot″o-jen´ik]
producing erotic feeling.

er·o·to·gen·ic

(er'ō-tō-jen'ik),
Capable of causing sexual excitement or arousal.
[G. erōs, love, + -gen, production]

er·o·to·gen·ic

(ĕ-rot'ō-jen'ik)
Capable of causing sexual excitement or arousal.
[G. erōs, love, + -gen, production]
References in periodicals archive ?
Of, we shall say, excitations.' (37) The inscription of excitations extends the erotogenic surface of the body, increasing the volume of skin via punctures and scar tissue: 'these incisions, these welts and raised scars, this graphics, are not signs; they are intensive points.
It has its origin in Freud's conception of the sexual drive, less as a unified "instinct" than as a composite, with its source in distinctive erotogenic zones (oral, anal, genital), which are activated through external stimulation (sucking, washing, rubbing).
Not surprisingly, among Clifford's cronies, regression--the traversal of the erotogenic zones in the opposite direction--is a powerful regulatory concept in their discussions: they view sex itself as a "primitive reversion," an atavistic retreat from more sophisticated intellectual and cultural concerns.
When I was fourteen, the highly specialized and erotogenic touch-zone that exercised the greatest attraction was not, in fact, the mouth, despite my newfound appreciation of kissing, but a "situation" located some distance below.
This derivation for "erotogenic" or "original" masochism (masochism proper) extends the implications of Freud's speculations from Beyond the Pleasure Principle that the sex and death drives are inextricably tied up together insofar as sexual tensions activate a primal destructive urge to return to an inert state.
Though he admits that such passivity is not "the whole of masochism," in 1924, he subsequently delimits a "feminine" from the "erotogenic" and "moral" forms of masochism and locates it in men whose fantasies place them in "characteristically female situations; they signify, that is, being castrated, or copulated with, or giving birth to a baby" ("Economic" 162).
The hustler glamour of Paul Schrader's erotogenic Los Angeles is affected and then dismembered in Haynes' title sequence which bathes in appropriated gloss.
But this controversy really centers around the critical claim that the preoedipal is not to be understood with Freud's synonym, "the pregenital," that is, it is not to be understood in terms of Freud's instinctual drive theory as the period in which libido is expressed primarily in and through the oral and anal erotogenic zones and in which aggression takes primarily the forms of oral sadism and anal sadism.
Invoking Freud early on in his treatise, Nancy compares the discreteness of the aesthetic experience to the erotogenic zones (1996, 16).
In this paper, Freud distinguishes three forms of masochism, "as a condition imposed on sexual excitation, as an expression of the feminine nature, and as a norm of behavior." These three forms are then classified by him as respectively, "erotogenic, feminine, and moral masochism" (Freud 1984, 415).
Moreover, unlike Wharton's "perverse" narrative, which engages super-ordinate binaries such as "finance" and "sexuality," "homo-" and "hetero-" desire in a variety of configurations that strategically destabilize them as "natural," discrete categories, the formal organization of Freud's text orders an iconography of sexuality that metaphorizes woman as the natural, reciprocal "other" in the male/female pair, and hierarchizes desire in a taxonomy of gender, erotogenic zones, and reproductive function.
The component instincts--defined by Freud as those attached to pregenital erotogenic zones, particularly the oral and anal--are organized during the oedipal stage into that genitality that for Freud constitutes human sexuality.(2) Significantly, the component instinct that most insists itself into Freud's texts as the one above which the human subject has to rise is anal eroticism.