erosive

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e·ro·sive

(ē-rō'siv),
1. Having the property of eroding or wearing away.
2. An eroding agent.

e·ro·sive

(ē-rō'siv)
1. Having the property of eroding or wearing away.
2. An eroding agent.

erosive

(ē-rō′sĭv)
1. Able to produce erosion.
2. An agent that erodes tissues or structures.
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, for potential soil erosion risk map overlay analysis is performed on erodibility, erosivity and slope which is classified into low (0-5 index), moderate (5-11 index) and high (above 11 index) erosion risk areas.
CII-specific IgG antibodies have multiple effects in arthritis; they can have a cartilage destabilizing function and subsequently contribute to inflammation and bone-cartilage erosivity through immune complex formation and/or activation of complement [53-56].
Rainfall-runoff erosivity is estimated using the measured [EI.sub.30]: total energy of each storm (E) times the maximum 30min intensity (I.sub.30]) of the storm, added for all storms in an N years period and divided by the number of years in record (Renard et al., 1997).
Erosivity is accounted for in this model by the rainfall erosivity factor (R) in MJ mm [hr.sup.-1] [ha.sup.-1] (hundreds of ft tonf in [hr.sup.-1] [ac.sup.-1]).
Luer, "The Relative Erosivity of Limestone, Dolomite and Coal Samples from an Operating Boiler," Wear 215, 180-190 (1998).
We call the power of rain to cause erosion the "erosivity" of rainfall.
Besides incorporating advances in computer technology, RUSLE has been improved with new rainfall/runoff erosivity values for the western United States and new ways to calculate factors such as prior land use and slope length and steepness.
Palmquist and Danielson (1989) reported that land values are significantly affected by both potential erosivity and drainage requirements.
Estimating the rainfall erosivity factor (R) of the universal soil loss equation (USLE) requires the calculation of the rainfall erosivity index ([EI.sub.30]), which is the product from two specific parameters of erosive precipitations in a location: total kinetic energy of the rainfall (E), and maximum intensity of rainfall in 30 min ([I.sub.30]).