erosion

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erosion

 [e-ro´zhun]
an eating or gnawing away; a shallow or superficial ulceration; in dentistry, the wasting away or loss of substance of a tooth by a chemical process that does not involve known bacterial action. adj., adj ero´sive.
cervical erosion destruction of the squamous epithelium of the vaginal portion of the cervix, due to irritation and later ulceration.

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn),
1. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure. Compare: corrosion.
2. A shallow ulcer; in the stomach and intestine, an ulcer limited to the mucosa, with no penetration of the muscularis mucosa.
3. Chemically induced tooth loss, occurring mainly through acid dissolution. When the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion. Synonym(s): odontolysis
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]

erosion

(ĭ-rō′zhən)
n.
The superficial destruction of a surface by friction, pressure, ulceration, or trauma.

erosive (ĭ-rō′sĭv) adj.

erosion

A wearing away, ulceration. See Apple core erosion, Cervical erosion.

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn)
1. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure.
2. A shallow ulcer; in the stomach and intestine, an ulcer limited to the mucosa, with no penetration of the muscularis mucosae.
3. The wearing away of a tooth by nonbacterial chemical action; when the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion.
Synonym(s): odontolysis.
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]

erosion

the wearing away of geological formations such as rock, soil, etc. For example, deafforestation or the removal of hedges causes soil erosion.

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn)
1. Chemically induced tooth loss, occurring mainly through acid dissolution. When the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion.
Synonym(s): odontolysis.
2. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure.
Compare: corrosion
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]
References in periodicals archive ?
Acids of bacterial origin cause caries, while extrinsic and intrinsic acids cause dental erosion.7 Sources of extrinsic acid loads include soft drinks i.e.
The presence of the highly acidic gastric juice (pH 1.0-3.0) in the oral cavity may lead to dental erosion. Initially, dental erosion appears as a smooth silky-shining glazed enamel surface which may lead to the development of shallow concavities on the crowns and grooving of the edges or the cusps of the tooth surfaces.8-10 Dental erosion can be an occupational hazard.11 It is caused by exposure to various types of acidic contaminants in the workplace such as chemicals, petrochemicals, metals and semiconductors.11
Treatment of larger areas involving exposed tissues or recurrent erosion is best treated by advancing the vaginal epithelium to cover the defect, Dr.
For bladder or urethral erosion, avoid urethral dilation, which can loosen the sling, but which also places the sling closer to the urethra thereby increasing the potential for more erosion, Dr.
The opinion that cavitation erosion is mostly a mechanic phenomena is sustained also by following experimental results (Franc & Michel 2004):
Of the 964 patients with nonerosive GERD, 61% were women; there were nearly 60% more women with no esophageal erosion, compared with men.
Dental erosion is defined as the progressive, irre- versible loss of dental hard tissues due to a chemical process not involving bacteria.
Three previous studies of mesh erosions in women with an intact or missing vaginal apex produced conflicting results.
Water erosion models can be classified into two categories, empirical models and process- based mechanistic models.
This approach is possible as erosion (rate) is a function of particle velocity and particle impingement angle for any given material.
The soil-water suspension from each field plot is collected in a trough, and then diverted by a 100-mm (4 in) PVC pipe to the automated erosion wheel.