erosion

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erosion

 [e-ro´zhun]
an eating or gnawing away; a shallow or superficial ulceration; in dentistry, the wasting away or loss of substance of a tooth by a chemical process that does not involve known bacterial action. adj., adj ero´sive.
cervical erosion destruction of the squamous epithelium of the vaginal portion of the cervix, due to irritation and later ulceration.

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn),
1. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure. Compare: corrosion.
2. A shallow ulcer; in the stomach and intestine, an ulcer limited to the mucosa, with no penetration of the muscularis mucosa.
3. Chemically induced tooth loss, occurring mainly through acid dissolution. When the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion. Synonym(s): odontolysis
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]

erosion

/ero·sion/ (ĕ-ro´zhun) an eating or gnawing away; a shallow or superficial ulceration; in dentistry, the wasting away or loss of substance of a tooth by a chemical process that does not involve known bacterial action.ero´sive

erosion

(ĭ-rō′zhən)
n.
The superficial destruction of a surface by friction, pressure, ulceration, or trauma.

erosive (ĭ-rō′sĭv) adj.

erosion

[irō′zhən]
Etymology: L, erodere, to consume
1 the wearing away or gradual destruction of a surface. For example, a mucosal or epidermal surface may erode as a result of inflammation, injury, or other causes, usually marked by the appearance of an ulcer. See also necrosis.
2 the action of acid (low pH) substances dissolving tooth structure. Can be due to habitual sucking on citrus fruits such as lemons, from acidic swimming pool water, or gastroesophageal reflux.

erosion

A wearing away, ulceration. See Apple core erosion, Cervical erosion.

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn)
1. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure.
2. A shallow ulcer; in the stomach and intestine, an ulcer limited to the mucosa, with no penetration of the muscularis mucosae.
3. The wearing away of a tooth by nonbacterial chemical action; when the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion.
Synonym(s): odontolysis.
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]

erosion

the wearing away of geological formations such as rock, soil, etc. For example, deafforestation or the removal of hedges causes soil erosion.

erosion

wearing away, by friction or pressure

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn)
1. Chemically induced tooth loss, occurring mainly through acid dissolution. When the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion.
Synonym(s): odontolysis.
2. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure.
Compare: corrosion
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]

erosion (ērō´zhən),

n the chemical or mechanicochemical destruction of tooth substance, the mechanism of which is incompletely known, which leads to the creation of concavities of many shapes at the cementoenamel junction of teeth. The surface of the cavity, unlike dental caries, is hard and smooth.
Enlarge picture
Erosion.

erosion

an eating or gnawing away; a shallow or superficial ulceration; in dentistry, the wasting away or loss of substance of a tooth by a chemical process that does not involve known bacterial action.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sandstones of the Oredezh Beds most probably are fluvial deposits, as evidenced by their fine- to coarse-grained structures, the presence of erosional surfaces and channels, almost unidirectional current flow and channel orientation, as well as the absence of typical tidal sedimentary structures.
137]Cs percentage residuals between the strong and weak erosional areas (Table 1).
1], sendo que os valores mais elevados foram encontrados nas areas de ocorrencia de declive mais irregular, na area de ocorrencia das superficies geomorficas II e III, demonstrando o seu carater erosional.
Because they are mostly erosional remnants, however, they actually came from the portions of the Garber Sandstone higher in the stratigraphic section, which are now eroded, but would extend toward the west in the subsurface.
All defined sequences are separated one to other by erosional unconformities.
Many erosional surfaces are of etch or two-stage type, that is, they are exposed weathering fronts (MABBUTT, 1961; TWIDALE, 2002).
A preoccupation with net rate of erosional soil loss on the assumption that severity of loss of soil productivity is primarily and in some way directly caused by this.
Edatico Hidroclimatico Debilidades Pendientes escarpadas con Alta variabilidad de la pre un relieve montaooso fluvio- cipitaci on, que incide en erosional en donde predomi- procesos de degradacion de nan procesos de perdida.
For the purposes of the study, the shoreline was defined as the edge of the erosional scarp that borders the majority of the GIWW in the study area.
Although we did not discern differences in denitrification between continually flooded and non-flooded (but occasionally wetted) soils, it is evident from our results, and from Green (1998), that controlled seasonal flooding can greatly reduce erosional losses of soil particles and associated nutrients.
The attractive silt bluffs and erosional scarps were formed as ancestral Lake Penticton drained in distinct intervals.