erosion


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Related to erosion: Wind erosion, soil erosion

erosion

 [e-ro´zhun]
an eating or gnawing away; a shallow or superficial ulceration; in dentistry, the wasting away or loss of substance of a tooth by a chemical process that does not involve known bacterial action. adj., adj ero´sive.
cervical erosion destruction of the squamous epithelium of the vaginal portion of the cervix, due to irritation and later ulceration.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn),
1. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure. Compare: corrosion.
2. A shallow ulcer; in the stomach and intestine, an ulcer limited to the mucosa, with no penetration of the muscularis mucosa.
3. Chemically induced tooth loss, occurring mainly through acid dissolution. When the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion. Synonym(s): odontolysis
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

erosion

(ĭ-rō′zhən)
n.
The superficial destruction of a surface by friction, pressure, ulceration, or trauma.

erosive (ĭ-rō′sĭv) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

erosion

A wearing away, ulceration. See Apple core erosion, Cervical erosion.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn)
1. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure.
2. A shallow ulcer; in the stomach and intestine, an ulcer limited to the mucosa, with no penetration of the muscularis mucosae.
3. The wearing away of a tooth by nonbacterial chemical action; when the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion.
Synonym(s): odontolysis.
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

erosion

the wearing away of geological formations such as rock, soil, etc. For example, deafforestation or the removal of hedges causes soil erosion.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn)
1. Chemically induced tooth loss, occurring mainly through acid dissolution. When the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion.
Synonym(s): odontolysis.
2. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure.
Compare: corrosion
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, senior officials of the Punjab Irrigation Department visited the erosion-hit villages directed the Sialkot district administration to make drastic measures to save the villages from erosion.
Many people including Baba Muhammad Sharif and Shahid Khan told Dawn that the erosion of soil by Nullah Baeen was causing financial losses and had put the lives of thousands of people in danger.
Gulzar Ahmad and Muhammad Riaz said they had informed in writing the Shakargarh assistant commissioner and Narowal deputy commissioner about the dangers the erosion of soil posed to the villagers but their requests had fallen on deaf ears.
(2013) soil erosion because of water is turning into a genuine issue in downpour encouraged zones of Potwar area.
Results from a UC study suggest that a majority of California's rangeland is resistant to sheet and rill erosion if recommended residual forage dry matter levels are being achieved.
Forest conversion means reducing the hydrological function of watershed as the result of the increase of erosion and sedimentation which causes water holding capacity decreases (Andreassian, 2004; Masnang et al., 2014).
But erosion rates half when fruit teas are drunk with meals.
Because his paper focused on the erosion rate of the abrasive gas jet, the abrasive velocity was the most relevant to rock breakage.
Figures 4(a) and 4(b) show the erosion depth and material removal amount with and without the ultrasonic vibration.
Key Words: Dental erosion, Chemical factory workers, Lahore.
(s002) and Jankauskas (22012s) indicated that soil erosion causes irreversible processes in chemical properties of soil along hillsloper by thinning the Ap thickness.