erode

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e·rode

(ē-rōd'),
1. To cause, or to be affected by, erosion.
2. To remove by ulceration.
[L. erodo, to gnaw away]

e·rode

(ē-rōd')
1. To cause, or to be affected by, erosion.
2. To remove by ulceration.
[L. erodo, to gnaw away]

erode

(ē-rōd′) [L. erodere]
1. To wear away.
2. To eat away by ulceration.

e·rode

(ē-rōd')
1. To cause, or to be affected by, erosion.
2. To remove by ulceration.
[L. erodo, to gnaw away]
References in periodicals archive ?
Here exists thick vegetation and the soil is slightly erodible, covered with stones thus protecting it from rain splash.
The two components together--$16 billion for retiring highly erodible land and $8 billion for adopting conservation practices--give an annual total for the world of $24 billion.
The 1985 FSA also defined highly erodible soil and utilized the "T value" as the goal to be achieved.
If soils have an El greater than 8, they are considered highly erodible and the producer needs to seriously consider their suitability for cultivation.
Be covered by a conservation plan for any highly erodible land;
The law's flagship environmental component is the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), which pays farmers to plant native grasses or trees instead of crops on highly erodible land.
Since it was formed in 1997, the task force has developed several strategies to help reduce blowing dust and stabilize erodible farm land throughout the Antelope Valley.
The spread of maize brings to southern England the world's most erodible crop.
This field research was done on highly erodible Memphis Silt Loarg Soil (Typic hapludalf, silty, mixed, thermic) in 1993 and 1994 to compare the LAI, biomass and yield of snap beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.
Serpentine "barrens" are rare natural communities composed of grasslands and oak savanna growing around outcrops of serpentine, a magnesium-rich mineral that contributes to dry, acidic, erodible, nutrient-poor soils.
This sandy, highly erodible fill necessitated the addition of a five-ft wide shoulder or transition strip adjacent to the concrete.