erode

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e·rode

(ē-rōd'),
1. To cause, or to be affected by, erosion.
2. To remove by ulceration.
[L. erodo, to gnaw away]

e·rode

(ē-rōd')
1. To cause, or to be affected by, erosion.
2. To remove by ulceration.
[L. erodo, to gnaw away]

erode

(ē-rōd′) [L. erodere]
1. To wear away.
2. To eat away by ulceration.

e·rode

(ē-rōd')
1. To cause, or to be affected by, erosion.
2. To remove by ulceration.
[L. erodo, to gnaw away]
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, it is necessary to quantify the comprehensive effects of vegetation restoration on soil erodibility on steep gully slopes using multiple indicators.
With respect to the issue of how different sizes of initial cracks affect the barrier behaviours against eroding, the material erodibility and the water velocity inside the mass should be considered concurrently.
Erosion prediction on unpaved mountain roads in northern Thailand: Validation of dynamic erodibility modelling using KINEROS2.
M[L.sup.-2][T.sup.-1] sup.2]/yr Stream size Q [m.sup.3]/s [L.sup.3][T.sup.-1] Furrow length X m L Top width W m L of flow Soil I mm/hr L[T.sup.-1] infiltration rate Time of flow T s T of water Soil K Kg x hr/ [L.sup.-3][T.sup.3] erodibility [Nm.sup.2] factor Hydraulic [tau] N/[m.sup.2] M[L.sup.-1][T.sup.-2] shear stress TABLE 3: Potential furrow irrigation-induced erosion (t/ha/yr) at combined furrow lengths, furrow widths, and slopes steepness.
Iglik, "Annual variations of soil erodibility of silt loam developed from less based on 10-years runoff-plot studies," Annals of Warsaw University of Life Sciences SGGW, Series of Land Reclamation, vol.
Finally, for potential soil erosion risk map overlay analysis is performed on erodibility, erosivity and slope which is classified into low (0-5 index), moderate (5-11 index) and high (above 11 index) erosion risk areas.
This result suggests that the application of AZ improved the erodibility of sodic soil, a finding which is consistent with the increase in MWD of the soil shown in Table 2.
For example, recent lab-scale JET tests on a silty sand soil and a silty clay soil showed that both soil compaction and water content have a significant impact on erodibility. While higher compaction increased erosion resistance, soil texture and water content at the time of compaction affected resistance as much--or more.
Dry aggregate stability, a measure of the erodibility of the surface by wind, was assessed using the method described by Leys et al.