ergonomics

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er·go·nom·ics

(er'gō-nom'iks),
A branch of ecology concerned with human factors in the design and operation of machines and the physical environment.
[ergo- + G. nomos, law]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ergonomics

The formal study of the work environment, which evaluates and, if necessary, reconfigures a workplace by taking into account the anatomic, physiological and psychological variables of those working in the environment.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ergonomics

Occupation medicine The formal study of work situations, which attempts to evaluate, and if necessary, reconfigure a workplace by taking into account the anatomic and psychological variables of those working in the environment. See Ergogenic engineering, Human factor.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

er·go·nom·ics

(ĕr'gŏ-nom'iks)
The science of workplace, tools, and equipment designed to reduce worker discomfort, strain, and fatigue and to prevent work-related injuries.
The science of workplace, tools, and equipment designed to reduce worker discomfort, strain, and fatigue and to prevent work-related injuries.
[ergo- + G. nomos, law]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ergonomics

The scientific study of humans in relation to their working environment and the application of science to improve working conditions. The increasing application of complex technology has resulted in increasing human discomfort, difficulties and dangers. Ergonomics seeks to solve such problems.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

er·go·nom·ics

(ĕr'gŏ-nom'iks)
The science of workplace, tools, and equipment designed to reduce worker discomfort, strain, and fatigue and to prevent work-related injuries.
[ergo- + G. nomos, law]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The first asked the participants to rate on the 5-point scale their agreement with the statement "While getting used to the periscope, the support from the ergonomist was helpful," and the second directly asked the participants to rate on the 5-point scale their agreement with the statement "Overall, I would prefer to work with the periscope workstation setup." Finally, Task Assessment Survey 3 was a forced-choice survey that addressed each of the four areas (ease of use, comfort, accuracy, and productivity) but required the participant to choose between the standard configuration (Day 1) and the periscope configuration (Day 2).
An ergonomist may also conduct Symptom surveys that gather perceptions from workers about job tasks and workspace design.
Interviews with equipment suppliers, ergonomists, government officials, and plastics processors identified five basic types of equipment that create ergonomic harmony between the worker and the work.
"That's pretty specific and already in the code," says state ergonomist Steve Morrissey.
Messing, a biologist and ergonomist, questions the methods used to conduct gender inclusive research in occupational health.
These days, you must also be an impeccable recordkeeper, emission control scientist, researcher and interpreter of regulatory codes, cost-cutter, teacher, market penetrator, ergonomist and community leader, to name a few.
"We have shown conclusively that workers make 60 percent more typing movements within a low risk zone for carpal tunnel syndrome when using a conventional keyboard placed on a unique, presettiltdown keyboard holder which we tested, compared with using conventional keyboards on desks or articulating keyboard trays, whether or not wrist rests were used," says project leader and ergonomist Alan Hedge, Ph.D., Cornell professor of design and environmental analysis.
Just as an ergonomist goes into a facility and measures the biomechanical factors that may be contributing to musculoskeletal injuries, a cognitive ergonomist can go into a workplace and analyze the psychological factors that may be contributing to perceived or real incidents of stress, discrimination, harassment, job dissatisfaction, or fear.
The second type teaches middle managers responsible for workers' compensation how to prevent future claims from their area of expertise (the type of consultant you hire, be it an ergonomist, safety engineer, lawyer, or insurance auditor, defines the type of analysis you receive).
The ergonomist is partly a psychologist and partly an engineer, and many have one or the other background.
* Should you hire an ergonomist? None of the retailers asked said they had, but they didn't rule it out.