equivalence trial


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equivalence trial

A clinical trial with the primary objective of showing that the response to two or more treatments differs by an amount that is clinically insignificant, which is usually demonstrated by showing that the true treatment difference lies between a lower and an upper equivalence margin of clinically acceptable differences.

equivalence trial

Clinical trials A study–eg, COBALT, intended to circumvent the ethical dilemmas of comparing a new therapy to a placebo which is known to be less effective than a proven therapy, by running the new agent against a standard therapy. See Clinical trial, COBALT.

equivalence trial

A randomized clinical trial in which two distinct agents are compared head-to-head against each other, and sometimes, but not always, against an inert agent (a placebo) as well. If two agents work equally well, the treatment that is less expensive, better tolerated, or more easily administered, may be preferable to use.

equivalence trial

A randomized clinical trial in which two distinct agents are compared with each other and sometimes with an inert agent (a placebo) as well. If two agents work equally well, the less expensive, better tolerated, or more easily administered one may be preferred.
See also: trial
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparing (5) and (6) we can see that the equivalence trial is the intersection of two non-inferiority trials.
Most equivalence trials are bioequivalence trials that aim to compare a generic drug with the original commercial drug, to show that they have the "same" pharmacokinetic PK) profile, expressed by the most common PK variables: Cmax, Cmin and AUC (area under the curve).
Such differential test performance is not uncommon, whereby participants score with higher accuracy on symmetry trials than equivalence trials (e.g., Fields & Verhave, 1987), but the high degree of errors made on the equivalence test is rather interesting.
These results suggest that baseline mixed among emergent test trials was related to increased response speed in equivalence trials, particularly in participants with a prior training and testing history.
The middle section of each panel shows speeds on baseline, symmetry, and equivalence trials during the first test trials.
Each participant also satisfied the 90% criteria for the baseline and equivalence trials in one session in phase 7 and the 95% criterion for the equivalence trials in one session in phase 8.
Of the 180 trials, there were 36 baseline trials, 36 symmetry trials, 54 transitivity, and 54 equivalence trials. The 180 trials in the last block were presented without any programmed consequences.
Testing Following the four training phases described above, participants were presented with a test phase consisting of a single block of 48 randomly presented trials: 18 symmetry trials and 18 equivalence trials (three trials for each specific relation evaluated), and 12 baseline trials, two for each trained relation.
The test consisted of 300 trials, divided into 60 baseline trials, 60 symmetry trials, 90 transitivity trials and 90 equivalence trials. Class formation was documented if at least 95 % of all trials in the test block produced class-consistent selections.
In general, equivalence trials are associated with the slowest RTs (Amtzen et al.
Specifically, test blocks presented 12 training trials (A-B, B-C), 12 symmetry trials (B-A, C-B), six transitivity trials (A-C), and six equivalence trials (C-A).
The software also provided a summary of baseline or direct trained trials, symmetry trials, transitivity trials, and equivalence trials as well as the duration of the experiment.