equivalency

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Related to equivalence relation: Equivalence class

e·quiv·a·lence

, equivalency (ē-kwiv'ă-lens, -len-sē),
1. The property of an element or radical of combining with or displacing, in definite and fixed proportion, another element or radical in a compound.
2. The point in a precipitin test at which antibody and antigen are present in optimal proportions.
[L. aequus, equal, + valentia, strength (valence)]

e·quiv·a·lence

, equivalency (ē-kwiv'ă-lĕns, -lĕn-sē)
The property of an element or radical of combining with or displacing, in definite and fixed proportion, another element or radical in a compound.
[L. aequus, equal, + valentia, strength (valence)]

equivalency

the combining power of an electrolyte. See also equivalent.
References in periodicals archive ?
Then, in Section 3 we discuss the notion of parallel residues and describe the buildings in which parallelism is an equivalence relation.
Since we want a poset, it is necessary to require two more properties of our equivalence relation.
A triple (t, E, [alpha]) is called a time scale if t is a nonempty closed subset of r and E is an arranged equivalence relation on t.
This can be seen as further support for the RFT approach as Barnes et al suggested that symbol-referent relations (in natural language) are functionally similar to equivalence relations in a matching-to-sample context.
Overall, most participants indicated that they would include more examples in the lesson, including more examples of equivalence relations, more mathematical examples, and more examples generated and constructed by students in the classroom.
Clearly, T/I relation is an equivalence relation in [\[Z.
Let R be an equivalence relation, where its partition of U is given by
This internal category will be a groupoid precisely when the given reflexive and transitive relation R is symmetric, so that if in C every internal category is an internal groupoid, then all of its internal reflexive and transitive relations are equivalence relations.
The following theorem due to Hivert and Nzeutchap [13] shows that an equivalence relation on [A.
This sentence has an air of authority about it; the concept of an equivalence relation is well established in many fields and is intersubjectively defined as a (Type 1) relation that is symmetric, reflexive, and transitive.
Now let m : X' [right arrow] X be a monomorphism in C such that the monomorphism U(m) is normal to the equivalence relation R in D, namely such that we have a discrete fibration in D:
As described above, when an equivalence relation is established, arbitrary stimuli are substitutable for one another such that a = b.