equilibrium

(redirected from equilibriums)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia.

equilibrium

 [e″kwĭ-lib´re-um]
1. harmonious adjustment of different elements or parts; called also balance.
2. a state of chemical balance in the body, reached when the tissues contain the proper proportions of various salts and water. See also acid-base balance and fluid balance.
dynamic equilibrium the condition of balance between varying, shifting, and opposing forces that is characteristic of living processes.

e·qui·lib·ri·um

(ē'kwi-lib'rē-ŭm),
1. The condition of being evenly balanced; a state of repose between two or more antagonistic forces that exactly counteract each other.
See also: equilibrium constant.
2. In chemistry, a state of apparent repose created by two reactions proceeding in opposite directions at equal speed; in chemical equations, sometimes indicated by two opposing arrows (⇄) instead of the equal sign.
See also: equilibrium constant. Synonym(s): dynamic equilibrium
[L. aequilibrium, a horizontal position, fr. aequus, equal, + libra, a balance]

equilibrium

Imaging
An MRI term for a state of balance between two opposing forces or divergent spheres of influence.

equilibrium

A state of constancy in a system; a population might be in static equilibrium–no pasa nada–ie, no births or deaths, or in dynamic equilibrium–ie, same numbers of births and deaths; the state to which a system evolves–eg, sustained periodic oscillations. See Chemical equilibrium, Linkage equilibrium, Sedimentation equilibrium Neurology A state of balance in the body, where forces are appropriately offset by counterforces. Cf Dizziness, Equilibrium, Vertigo Orthopedics A state of biomechanical homeostasis that enables persons to know where their bodies are in the environment and to maintain a desired position. See Fixed point equilibrium.

e·qui·lib·ri·um

(ē'kwi-lib'rē-ŭm)
1. The condition of being evenly balanced; a state of repose between two or more antagonistic forces that exactly counteract each other.
2. chemistry A state of apparent repose created by two reactions proceeding in opposite directions at equal speed; in chemical equations, sometimes indicated by two opposing arrows (↔) or (⇌).
Synonym(s): dynamic equilibrium.
[L. aequilibrium, a horizontal position, fr. aequus, equal, + libra, a balance]

e·qui·lib·ri·um

(ē'kwi-lib'rē-ŭm)
Condition of being evenly balanced; a state of repose between two or more antagonistic forces that exactly counteract each other.
[L. aequilibrium, a horizontal position, fr. aequus, equal, + libra, a balance]
References in periodicals archive ?
In the second set of cases, the postmerger equilibriums involve mixed strategies.
That, in turn, may change the nature of equilibrium and lead to higher prices after the merger.
It is interesting that the system without equilibrium exhibits hyperchaotic behavior for a = n = 1, b = m = 0.5, c = 0.2, and d = 2.5 and initial conditions (x(0), y(0), z(0), w(0)) = (0.1, 0.1, 0.1, 0.1) as illustrated in Figure 1.
Dynamical Behavior of the System without Equilibrium
The second equilibrium must achieve at total output level.
In a developing country like ours the said first level equilibrium is basically achieved through four mechanisms.
Case 4: Third world in the third world: ([k.sub.inf] > 0, bad equilibrium)
This case appears when we have only one equilibrium but [delta] + [eta] is very large compared to marginal returns of f(k).
Not all observers agreed that the going terms and rates were right, but buyers and sellers cleared them, and the market was at equilibrium.
The terms will likely not be as generous as they would have been a few months ago, but the mortgage origination market has thus far avoided a full-blown state of dis-equilibrium, and instead appears to be moving from one equilibrium state to another, new equilibrium state: 'dat-equilibrium.
The authors employ a New Neoclassical Synthesis model, specified to produce a unique equilibrium, in which policymakers follow a standard Henderson-McKibbin-Taylor rule to set the policy rate.
(2) If [gamma] [less than or equal to] 1, system (3) would only have one equilibrium point, (0, 0, 0).