equilibrium


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Related to equilibrium: Equilibrium of forces

equilibrium

 [e″kwĭ-lib´re-um]
1. harmonious adjustment of different elements or parts; called also balance.
2. a state of chemical balance in the body, reached when the tissues contain the proper proportions of various salts and water. See also acid-base balance and fluid balance.
dynamic equilibrium the condition of balance between varying, shifting, and opposing forces that is characteristic of living processes.

e·qui·lib·ri·um

(ē'kwi-lib'rē-ŭm),
1. The condition of being evenly balanced; a state of repose between two or more antagonistic forces that exactly counteract each other.
See also: equilibrium constant.
2. In chemistry, a state of apparent repose created by two reactions proceeding in opposite directions at equal speed; in chemical equations, sometimes indicated by two opposing arrows (⇄) instead of the equal sign.
See also: equilibrium constant. Synonym(s): dynamic equilibrium
[L. aequilibrium, a horizontal position, fr. aequus, equal, + libra, a balance]

equilibrium

/equi·li·bri·um/ (e″kwĭ-lib´re-um)
1. balance; harmonious adjustment of parts.

dynamic equilibrium  the condition of balance between varying, shifting, and opposing forces that is characteristic of living processes.

equilibrium

[ē′kwilib′rē·əm]
Etymology: L, aequilibrium
1 a state of balance or rest resulting from the equal action of opposing forces such as calcium and phosphorus in the body.
2 (in psychiatry) a state of mental or emotional balance.
3 (in radiotherapy) a point at which the rate of production of a daughter element is equal to the rate of decay of the parent element and the activities of parent and daughter are identical.

equilibrium

Imaging
An MRI term for a state of balance between two opposing forces or divergent spheres of influence.

equilibrium

A state of constancy in a system; a population might be in static equilibrium–no pasa nada–ie, no births or deaths, or in dynamic equilibrium–ie, same numbers of births and deaths; the state to which a system evolves–eg, sustained periodic oscillations. See Chemical equilibrium, Linkage equilibrium, Sedimentation equilibrium Neurology A state of balance in the body, where forces are appropriately offset by counterforces. Cf Dizziness, Equilibrium, Vertigo Orthopedics A state of biomechanical homeostasis that enables persons to know where their bodies are in the environment and to maintain a desired position. See Fixed point equilibrium.

e·qui·lib·ri·um

(ē'kwi-lib'rē-ŭm)
1. The condition of being evenly balanced; a state of repose between two or more antagonistic forces that exactly counteract each other.
2. chemistry A state of apparent repose created by two reactions proceeding in opposite directions at equal speed; in chemical equations, sometimes indicated by two opposing arrows (↔) or (⇌).
Synonym(s): dynamic equilibrium.
[L. aequilibrium, a horizontal position, fr. aequus, equal, + libra, a balance]

equilibrium

(1) in mechanics, a state when the force and moments on a body or object at rest or moving with constant velocity are balanced (i.e. the net force and net moment are zero); (2) in chemistry, the condition when there are no net changes in the concentrations of reacting substances and their products.

e·qui·lib·ri·um

(ē'kwi-lib'rē-ŭm)
Condition of being evenly balanced; a state of repose between two or more antagonistic forces that exactly counteract each other.
[L. aequilibrium, a horizontal position, fr. aequus, equal, + libra, a balance]

equilibrium (ē´kwilib´rēəm),

n a state of balance between two opposing forces or processes.
equilibrium, functional,
n the state of homeostasis within the oral cavity existing when biologic processes and local environmental factors, including the forces of mastication, are in a state of balance.
equilibrium, juvenile occlusal
(joo´vənīl əkloo´səl),
n one of the six eruptive phases of dentition, and the first of three postfunctional stages of eruption of the entire dentition. It occurs at or near adolescence when permanent teeth continue to erupt into the oral cavity in response to the vertical growth of the ramus.

equilibrium

a state of balance between opposing forces or influences. In the body, equilibrium may be chemical or physical. A state of chemical equilibrium is reached when the body tissues contain the proper proportions of various salts and water. See also acid-base balance and fluid balance. Physical equilibrium, such as the state of balance required for walking or standing, is achieved by a very complex interplay of opposing sets of muscles. The labyrinth of the inner ear contains the semicircular canals, or organs of balance, and relays to the brain information about the body's position and also the direction of body motions. Genetic equilibrium is achieved when the allelic frequencies do not change from generation to generation.

equilibrium dialysis
a technique for determining the affinity of an antibody for an antigen.
equilibrium disturbances
see posture, posture balance.
dynamic equilibrium
the condition of balance between varying, shifting and opposing forces that is characteristic of living processes.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is an abundance of published research linking vacancy to equilibrium and equilibrium to rents.
The equilibrium vacancy rate hypothesis is, therefore, that there must be a market vacancy rate where demand and supply are effectively equalized.
As examined above, regret introduces two interesting features that have a profound impact on the properties of the equilibrium outcomes.
In fact, we show that the self-selection constraints due to asymmetric information can be both satisfied for the equilibrium contracts under full information.
Only a large disturbance will force the individual's CoM projection to pass beyond the boundaries of the BoS such that the individual will leave the metastable state of equilibrium and eventually drop from the device.
2000) Fundamentals of equilibrium and steady state thermodynamics.
The intersection, which corresponds to the mutual best responses, determines the equilibrium.
gt; 0, there is not a Nash price equilibrium for any pair of locations, ([x.
Chapter Ten exemplifies some models -including models of markets for housing, cattle, and occupational choice- that conform to a general equilibrium framework.
For each tradition or period, Tieben identifies representatives of the end state and process approaches to equilibrium analysis.
Tieben's book begins with some introductory chapters which survey the various definitions of economic equilibrium and associated concepts, such as statics and dynamics, along with a study of the role and function of equilibrium from a methodological perspective (particularly with reference to what Tieben terms the 'neoclassical' equilibrium models).
A Nash equilibrium can be defined in a similar way, with the additional constraint that the probability distribution over outcomes must correspond to independent random selections by the various players.