equifinality


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equifinality

 [e″kwĭ-fi-nal´ĭ-te]
a principle of general systems theory stating that an open system can attain a time-independent state not dependent on initial conditions and determined only by the system parameters.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, there's something called the law of equifinality, which means there are multiple paths to the same destination (abundant thinking).
1997), "The Importance of Holism, Interdependence, and Equifinality Assumptions in High Performance Work Systems: Toward Theories of the High Performance Work Force", paper presented in Academy of Management Annual Meeting (Conference), Boston, MA.
There is a word from general systems theory: Equifinality.
Equifinality, data assimilation, and uncertainty estimation in mechanistic modelling of complex environmental systems.
Franks SW, Beven KJ, Quinn PF, Wright IR (1997) On the sensitivity of soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) schemes, Equifinality and the problem of robust calibration.
In complex fields where multicausalities and equifinality operate, the number and range of incompossible combinations commonly far exceed compossible ones" (page 1121, emphasis in original).
This is mainly because of their equifinality and commonality nature.
different life trajectories despite similar initial conditions, and equifinality, i.
According to the principle of equifinality, different transactions may lead to a limited number of patterns of organization (Bertalanffy, 1968).
Sawyer, "The Equifinality of War Termination: Multiple Paths to Ending War," Journal of Conflict Resolution 53, no.
In contrast to viewing human development as relatively stable and linear, contemporary developmental psychologists have emphasized the morphogenetic nature of development and have called attention to two principles that demonstrate the plasticity and discontinuity that often characterize human development: multifinality (looking prospectively) and its counterpart equifinality (looking retrospectively [Cicchetti & Rogosch, 1996; Feiring & Lewis, 1987]).