equatorial plane


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e·qua·to·ri·al plane

in metaphase of mitosis, the plane that touches all of the centromeres and their spindle attachments.

e·qua·to·ri·al plane

(ek'wă-tōr'ē-ăl plān)
In metaphase of mitosis, the plane that touches all the centromeres and their spindle attachments.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chromosomes from the male and female pronuclei gathered and aligned on the equatorial plane of the spindle organized by the two centrosomes (Fig.
The equatorial plane is formed by N(1) and N(5) from IMphtrz and by O(3) and O(4) from two hfac molecules.
This indicates that at the equatorial plane; the gravitational wave propagates at a phase velocity of c, unlike in the case of electromagnetic waves, where fields of the two electrodes cancel out each other due to charge symmetry.
The rings of Saturn lie in the equatorial plane of the planet, which means that at the March equinox on Saturn, the Sun rises for the northern side of the rings and sets for the southern side, whereas at the September equinox the Sun rises for the southern side of the rings and sets for the northern side.
Metaphase I--tetrads line up along the equatorial plane.
(v) the deviation of the beam from the equatorial plane (axial divergence).
Invariably the authors distinguish three orientations in the spherulite, as do BaltaCalleja and Peterlin (8): the equatorial plane perpendicular to the tensile direction, the diagonals of the spherulite and the meridional region parallel to the tensile direction, in which the lamellae are separated, sheared and compressed respectively.
The transformation on the equatorial plane is discussed in detail.
They believe that some 500 billion years ago, another tectonic shift caused the planet to veer a full 90 degrees, sending both poles into the equatorial plane and, quite possibly, prompting the "Cambrian explosion" of multicellular life.
Because of his general fascination with stars and the planets that extended beyond the earth's borders, he used his technical background to create a telescope mount with a revolving dome on an equatorial plane. Since the dome revolved, it didn't have to be open to allow the telescope to move.
An international team of researchers, led by scientists from the University of Geneva, Switzerland, found that unlike most planets, which orbit in the equatorial plane of their host stars, GJ436b has a polar orbit, which is to say, it orbits over the poles of its star, which is a red dwarf called GJ436.