eponymic


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ep·o·nym·ic

(ep'ō-nim'ik),
1. Relating to an eponym.
2. An eponym.
Referring to an eponym; derived from a proper name, which is so fully integrated in the mainstream language that it is commonly written in lowercase—e.g., gram stain and, increasingly, pap smear

ep·o·nym·ic

(ep'ŏ-nim'ik)
1. Relating to an eponym.
2. Synonym(s): eponym.
References in periodicals archive ?
What, for instance, are economists' eponymic propensities regarding the technical designations (theorem, hypothesis, law, and so forth) they attach to people's names when coining eponymic expressions?
The word dictum is associated with a special class of eponymic expressions that are not infrequent in economics, and I was disappointed to find that in this book they appear hardly at all.
Although the dictionary is ostensibly devoted to eponymic expressions that denote scientific concepts (as the subtitle implies), in practice the editors interpret their subject more broadly, which explains the inclusion of two items that would otherwise seem out of place: "Cowles Commission" and "Palgrave's dictionaries.
I must confess that I was only marginally successful, and they actually do seem to have listed most of the eponymic expressions used in our profession.
This item has considerable eponymic interest, for several reasons:
It exemplifies a special kind of eponymic expression in which the eponym's name (James Tobin in this case) is actually incorporated into the technical word for the concept itself.
It is not often that we can pinpoint the exact moment at which a particular eponymic expression was introduced.
In Annals of Mathematics, for instance, the titles of most papers carry at least one eponymic expression (and often two or three), and if the title does not, the abstract almost surely will.
that the eponymic expressions for commonly used scientific concepts will tend, in time, to become dissociated from the persons for whom they are named.