eponym


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eponym

 [ep´o-nim]
a name or phrase formed from or including a person's name, such as Hodgkin's disease, Cowper's glands, or Schick test. adj., adj eponym´ic, epon´ymous.

ep·o·nym

(ep'ō-nim),
The name of a disease, structure, operation, or procedure, usually derived from the name of the person who discovered or described it first.
[G. epōnymos, named after]

eponym

Medtalk A syndrome, lesion, surgical procedure or clinical sign that bears the name of the author who first described the entity, or less commonly, the name of the index Pt(s) in whom the lesion was first described

ep·o·nym

(ep'ŏ-nim)
The name of a disease, structure, operation, or procedure, usually derived from the name of the person who first discovered or described it.
Synonym(s): eponymic (2) .
[G. epōnymos, named after]

eponym

A name of a disease, syndrome, anatomical part, surgical instrument, etc derived from the name of the person who discovered, invented or first successfully promulgated it.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our goal in this series of papers on pericardial eponyms of inspection is to provide the reader with a unique and novel perspective and appreciation of the signs of pericarditis by first providing a synopsis of the physician who observed the sign; the sign as originally described; and if available, the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of the sign and its application in more modern-day clinical practice.
The objective of this commentary is to highlight the pervasive usage of both forms of medical eponyms in medical literature amongst prestigious medical journals indexed in the PubMed database.
Summary: We’re all familiar with certain proprietary eponyms, that is, trademarked terms that originally refer to a specific product, but have been hijacked by the general ...
In 1933 it was decided to formally remove eponyms from terminology (10).
The last patient in this list, did not became "an eponym" or stood behind any medical discovery, but rather became a symbol of unnecessary war, injury and suffering [38].
Now, Groupon has become what linguists call a proprietary eponym. Ts like Kleenex or Q-Tips--nobody calls them facial tissue or cotton swabs anymore.
When Parton was asked whether she minded being an eponym in this way, she joked, "No, there''s no such thing as baa-ad publicity."
YOU DON'T KNOW: As the eponym for Matt Connors's sophomore show at Canada and the subject of a large-scale photograph therein, this plaintive slogan reverberated through the process-conscious abstractions on view.
For instance, his surprisingly vivid recollection of a schoolboy flirtation he never acted on with the eponym of "The Walk with Elizanne" makes him ask if the one spot of joy he shared with her slid into oblivion on its own or whether he scotched it deliberately.
The book tells something about the person and the history behind the eponym, and also provides some landmark original descriptions, as of the hepatojugular reflux and the Hamman sign, to help the reader understand the direct observation and applied logic used by their discoverers.
(1) While others had previously described this clinical scenario, the eponym bears his name.