eponym


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eponym

 [ep´o-nim]
a name or phrase formed from or including a person's name, such as Hodgkin's disease, Cowper's glands, or Schick test. adj., adj eponym´ic, epon´ymous.

ep·o·nym

(ep'ō-nim),
The name of a disease, structure, operation, or procedure, usually derived from the name of the person who discovered or described it first.
[G. epōnymos, named after]

eponym

[ep′ənim]
Etymology: Gk, epi, above, onyma, name
a name for a disease, organ, procedure, or body function that is derived from the name of a person, usually a physician or scientist who first identified the condition or devised the object bearing the name. Examples include fallopian tube, Parkinson's disease, and Billing's method.

eponym

Medtalk A syndrome, lesion, surgical procedure or clinical sign that bears the name of the author who first described the entity, or less commonly, the name of the index Pt(s) in whom the lesion was first described

ep·o·nym

(ep'ŏ-nim)
The name of a disease, structure, operation, or procedure, usually derived from the name of the person who first discovered or described it.
Synonym(s): eponymic (2) .
[G. epōnymos, named after]

eponym

A name of a disease, syndrome, anatomical part, surgical instrument, etc derived from the name of the person who discovered, invented or first successfully promulgated it.

eponym

a name or phrase formed from or including a person's name, e.g. Theiler's disease, Cowper's gland, Aschheim-Zondek test.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on foregoing considerations, and assuming that all professionals in the field of health accept the current Anatomical Terminology for describing not only physical structures but also conditions that affect the patient for medical or surgical evaluation, understanding would be easier because they would be communicating in terms of structure and function which does not happen when eponyms are used (13) since applying a researcher's name to a given structure tells us nothing about its nature.
John Henry Poynting, developer and eponym of the Poynting vector, which describes the direction and magnitude of electromagnetic energy flow 7.
Hajji Bektash Wali is the eponym of the Bektashi Sufi order and he is considered as one of the principal teachers of Alevism.
Furthermore, the paper's publisher, Arianna Huffington, who has become the eponym of the newspaper, boasts her direct relationship with President Obama.
Beolens and Watkins also coauthored the eponym dictionary Whose Bird?
Garcia Velasco shows that (i) out of context, verbal eponyms may receive multiple interpretations, and (ii) the meaning of a verbal eponym may change from one context to another; unlike authors who argue that the meaning of these units is predictable.
In 1961 G Ricklefs created the eponym of Uhthoff for the transient deterioration of symptoms or the new appearance of symptoms with increasing body temperature in patients with demyelinating diseases.
Widely known by its eponym Graves' disease, diffuse hyperplasia of the thyroid gland is an autoimmune condition in which excess thyroid hormone production is unchecked by the normal feedback loop between the thyroid and the pituitary gland.
3) Extranodal infiltrates are often found in the absence of lymphadenopathy, in this case the term SHML would be inappropriate, being more correct the eponym RDD.