epoch

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epoch

In clinical trials, the interval of time in the planned conduct of a study—the term epoch is intended to replace period, cycle, phase, stage and other temporal terms. An epoch is associated with a purpose (e.g., screening, randomisation, treatment, follow-up), and applies across all arms of the study.

epoch

(ĕp′ŏk)
A measurable amount of time; e.g., the length of time used in standardized sleep studies (usually 30 sec to 1 min), or the duration of a particular geological or biological event, as indicated in earth sciences.
References in periodicals archive ?
An epochal change is called for in the way we all engage with the climate crisis.
Lynn describes how giant corporate institutions such as Wal-Mart have all but banished the free market from much of our economy--a staggering, epochal transformation that has, however, eluded the attention of economists, whose theories obstruct their observation of the actual world.
Epochal issues can change an electorate's mood or historical patterns; eight years ago, anger over the drawn-out impeachment of Bill Clinton inspired voters to add more Democrats to Congress, despite the "rule" of the sixth-year slump.
One increasingly sees in recent published work (and in dissertations-in-progress) the 1750-1850 periodization, for example, in which independence from Spain (1821) is still taken seriously, but as a watershed, in the sense that one needs to see which way political processes flow on either side, rather than as an epochal disjunction.
Author Alex Kershaw has developed a surefire formula to develop reader interest in his popular military histories: start with a small army unit and follow it into an epochal battle.
Cate doesn't do justice to Nietzsche's epochal notion of the potentially infinite perspectives for viewing everything; and he abruptly dismisses as "untenable" Nietzsche's claim that humans can't be held morally responsible for their actions, because they aren't free to begin with, and in the seamless continuum of existence there are, strictly speaking, no atomistic acts at all, just as there are no separate "things" in the naively realistic sense.
In theorizing 9/11 as an epochal turning point and postmodernity as a completed historical phase, Luperini trenchantly positions his view within the debate surrounding the various ideologies of modernity and postmodernity.
First, it refers to arguments regarding epochal changes in economic relations and organization which position culture as integral to economic organizations and institutions, and related changes in the type and relations of consumption.
But it was not always so--that title was once given to Whiteman--and Joshua Berrett makes a compelling case for the contributions of the classically trained Whiteman, a musician whose efforts to promote "symphonic jazz" led to the commissioning of George Gershwin to create his epochal Rhapsody in Blue.
He went on to a brilliant career that included at least one other epochal paper, his 1916 discussion of gravitational fields in "The Foundation of the General Theory of Relativity.
He'd like to take on Stravinsky's epochal music himself, but doesn't feel ready yet.
to affirm the historical importance and continuing necessity of traditional leadership roles in the Church, while recognizing the present kairos and gently prodding the Christian community and its leaders toward the "new epochal form" of Church on the horizon (48).