epithet


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ep·i·thet

(ep'i-thet),
Characterizing term or name.
[G. epithetos, added, fr. epi- + tithēmi, to place]

epithet

(ĕp′ə-thĕt′)
n.
1.
a. A term used to characterize a person or thing, such as rosy-fingered in rosy-fingered dawn or the Great in Catherine the Great.
b. A term used as a descriptive substitute for the name or title of a person, such as The Great Emancipator for Abraham Lincoln.
2. A disparaging or abusive word or phrase.
3. Biology A word in the scientific name of an organism following the name of the genus and denoting a species, subspecies, variety, or cultivar, as sativa in Lactuca sativa.

ep′i·thet′ic, ep′i·thet′i·cal adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
People start giving epithets to each other at an early age in nursery and it gets worse in the teenage years.
In fact, the description of Hera as "ox-eyed"--a curious epithet which is usually taken to signify beauty--is very appropriate for the present passage, in which the goddess adorns herself in all her finery and seduces Zeus.
Now, an epithet has typically been understood as "a term used to characterize a person or thing," and a racial epithet has typically been understood as a term used to characterize a person in a way relevantly relating to their race (Croom 2008, p.
In NINDS, ATLANTIS, ECASS II, ECASS III, and EPITHET, patients in the alteplase group were assigned to receive a total intravenous dose of 0*9 mg/kg bodyweight (90 mg maximum) whereas in ECASS I the total dose was 1*1 mg/kg (100 mg maximum).
Washington, Mar 9 (ANI): A Muslim documentary maker allegedly faced racial attacks and called racial epithets in the United States after he encroached into a house party, which he had not been invited to.
Thus, the epithet impetuous ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]; Dutch: onstuimig) was identified as I+V+, meaning that impetuous had in the original Dutch structure a primary loading on Extraversion (I+) and a secondary loading on Intellectual Autonomy (V+), and the epithet loud-sounding ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]; Dutch: lawaaierig) was identified as I+II-, a trait with a primary loading on Extraversion and a secondary negative loading on Agreeableness.
The lawsuit alleges that WWNS employees were targets of racial epithets and some of them were forced to leave Iraq.
Yet The Inner Circle reads as an encomium next to the bilious assessments of Kinsey's detractors, among whom monster seems to be the favored epithet.
The former, also an epithet of the Apostles, is more likely.
Now, deficit cutting is called "Rubinomics," and in this White House that's an epithet.
HAL: Well, then you remember that in Thomas Jefferson's first draft of the declaration, he calls King George a "tyrant," and a Tory delegate from Pennsylvania complains that the epithet is too strong.
If someone wants to Label me a 38th-year senior, I proudly accept the epithet, and the assignment.