omental appendices

(redirected from epiploic appendage)

omental appendices

[TA]
one of a number of little processes or sacs of peritoneum filled with adipose tissue and projecting from the serous coat of the large intestine, except the rectum; they are most evident on the transverse and sigmoid colon, being most numerous along the free tenia.

o·men·tal ap·pen·di·ces

(ō-men'tăl ă-pen'di-sēz) [TA]
One of a number of small processes or sacs of peritoneum filled with adipose tissue and projecting from the serous coat of the large intestine, except the rectum; they are most evident on the transverse and sigmoid colon, being most numerous along the free tenia.
Synonym(s): appendices omentales [TA] .
References in periodicals archive ?
Torsion of epiploic appendage mimic acute appendicitis.
We present a case in which a transverse colon epiploic appendage adhesion to the ascending colon mesentery resulted in a closed loop obstruction mimicking a pericecal internal hernia.
Epiploic appendagitis (EA) is a rare cause of acute abdominal pain caused by inflammation of an epiploic appendage. It has a nonspecific clinical presentation that may mimic other acute abdominal pathologies on physical exam, such as appendicitis, diverticulitis, or cholecystitis.
The affected epiploic appendage, adherent to the colonic wall, is frequently found to be surrounded by a hypoechoic border during USG (1).
Each epiploic appendage receives blood supply through the narrow stalk.
Epiploic appendage ligation and resection is rare and usually reserved for when conservative management fails or there is new or worsening symptoms such as fever, progressive pain, or refractory nausea and vomiting.
The most common etiologies of this entity are venous thrombosis (secondary) or torsion or incarceration of an epiploic appendage within a hernia sac (primary).
It consists of a thin, round, or oval high-attenuation ring representing thickened, inflamed visceral peritoneum surrounding the torsed epiploic appendage (Figure 26).75 Internally, the high-attenuation ring contains fat and often a central dot of high attenuation that represents the thrombosed central vein.
Epiploic appendagitis is the inflammation of epiploic appendages due to appendageal torsion or spontaneous venous thrombosis (9).
Epiploic appendages are peritoneal pouches that arise from the serosal surface of the colon except the rectum.
Epiploic appendagitis is an uncommon condition involving inflammation of epiploic appendages resulting from obstruction of blood flow within the tissue.
Epiploic appendages are peritoneal pouches (composed of adipose tissue) arising from the serosal surface of the colon, being attached by a vascular stalk.