epiphyte

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epiphyte

a plant such as some mosses and some orchids, that grows attached to another and uses it solely for purposes of support, doing it no harm, there being no parasitic association.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In epiphytic plants, autogamy has been interpreted as a mechanism to compensate for their apparent reduced capacity to attract pollinators due to their low floral display and highly aggregated spatial distribution in the forest canopy (Bush & Beach, 1995).
Unraveling the phylogeny of polygrammoid ferns (Polypodiaceae & Grammitidaceae): exploring aspects of the diversification of epiphytic plants. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 31: 1041-1063.
Markson, 2005.Exploitation of phanerogamic parasites and Epiphytic plants for their medicinal value.
These cells store water, preventing desiccation to which epiphytic plants can be prone [1].
This Neotropical-endemic family is characterized by terrestrial, epiphytic plants, small-sized with simple leaves arranged in a rosette (BENZING, 2000; LEME; MARIGO, 1994).
A still more enigmatic old-growth forest habitat -- reiterative branches with epiphytic plants -- is also absent in the grove.
Now the high range with clouded tops had become a series of low hills, and the vegetation had changed completely, since the area was dry; the tall luxuriant trees covered with bromeliads and other epiphytic plants had vanished, and were substituted by an uniform bushy and spiny vegetation about 3-4 m high, spattered by frequent cacti, and where a different kind of bromeliads existed.
They are epiphytic plants, which means that their leaves take in the water and nutrients they need to live.
The trail offers canoeists an opportunity to explore a hidden mangrove tunnel and its intriguing epiphytic plants, those that live on top of other plants.
MISTY FORESTS clinging to higher reaches of coastal mountain ranges support innumerable epiphytic plants, such as those perched among the ruby blooms of an erythrina tree (above), a kind of legume.