epiphysis


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epiphysis

 [e-pif´ĭ-sis] (pl. epi´physes) (Gr.)
1. the end of a long bone, usually wider than the shaft, and either entirely cartilaginous or separated from the shaft by a cartilaginous disk.
2. part of a bone formed from a secondary center of ossification, commonly found at the ends of long bones, on the margins of flat bones, and at tubercles and processes; during the period of longitudinal growth, epiphyses are separated from the main portion of the bone by cartilage. adj., adj epiphys´eal.
Structure and composition of a typical long bone showing the epiphysis. From Copstead, 1995.
epiphysis ce´rebri pineal body.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

e·piph·y·sis

, pl.

e·piph·y·ses

(e-pif'i-sis, -sēz), [TA]
A part of a long bone developed from a secondary center of ossification, distinct from that of the shaft, and separated at first from the latter by a layer of cartilage.
[G. an excrescence, fr. epi, upon, + physis, growth]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

epiphysis

(ĭ-pĭf′ĭ-sĭs)
n. pl. epiphy·ses (-sēz′)
1. The end of a long bone that is originally separated from the main bone by a layer of cartilage but later becomes united to the main bone through ossification.

ep′i·phys′i·al (ĕp′ə-fĭz′ē-əl), ep′i·phys′e·al adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

e·piph·y·sis

, pl. epiphyses (e-pif'i-sis, -sēz) [TA]
A part of a long bone developed from a center of ossification distinct from that of the shaft and separated at first from the latter by a layer of cartilage.
[G. an excrescence, fr. epi, upon, + physis, growth]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

epiphysis

The growing sector at the end of a long bone. During the period of growth, the epiphysis is separated by a plate of CARTILAGE from the shaft of the bone. The edge of this plate nearest the shaft becomes progressively converted into bone, while the other edge develops new cartilage. In this way, the bone lengthens.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

epiphysis

the ossified part of the end of a mammalian limb bone or vertebra which, during growth, is separated by a plate of cartilage from the rest of the ossified bone. When growth is complete the epiphysis fuses with the rest of the bone. Compare DIAPHYSIS.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

e·piph·y·sis

, pl. epiphyses (e-pif'i-sis, -sēz) [TA]
Part of long bone developed from secondary center of ossification, distinct from that of the shaft, and separated at first from the latter by a layer of cartilage.
[G. an excrescence, fr. epi, upon, + physis, growth]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The pathogenesis of the early deformity of the capital femoral epiphysis in Legg-Calve-Perthes syndrome (LCPS): An arthrographic study.
Stage 3: Metaphysis and epiphysis are partially fused.
Irreducible Salter Harris type II fracture of the distal radial epiphysis. J Pediatr Orthop 1987;7(6):719-21.
In stage 0, a radiolucent area was observed between the epiphysis and the diaphysis (Figure 1).
The medial clavicular epiphysis remained in place; thus, the lesion was classified as an epiphysiolysis type Salter I.
This patient was subsequently treated with empiric antibiotics for an assumed osteomyelitis after MRI revealed a hyperintense T2 signal within the proximal humeral epiphysis. Eight weeks later, he began complaining of left lower quadrant abdominal pain.
When arising in the long bones, the tumor usually involves only the epiphysis or the epiphysis with metaphyseal extension, although CBTs arising from nonepiphyseal sites have also been reported.
Caption: Figure 4: AP pelvis X-ray obtained 12 weeks from initial presentation with progressive lattening of femoral epiphysis indicative of segmental collapse seen in non-Perthes osteonecrosis.
Osteophagic activity promoted by termites was observed in anatomical sites with predominance of thin cortical bone and abundant spongy bone, namely: vertebrae, articular surface of the sacrum and epiphysis of the tibia, fibula and femur.
At the fetal developmental stage, the epiphysis of the femoral condyle is composed of cartilaginous tissue that is characterized by zone-specific cellular phenotypes and still lacks the secondary center of ossification (Figure 2(a)).
SCFE is characterised by displacement of the capital femoral epiphysis from the metaphysis through the physis.
The epiphysis fuses with the shaft at around the age of 17 and the bones stop growing.