epineurium


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Related to epineurium: endoneurium

epineurium

 [ep″ĭ-noor´e-um]
the sheath of a peripheral nerve. adj., adj epineu´rial.

ep·i·neu·ri·um

(ep'i-nū'rē-ŭm), [TA]
The outermost supporting structure of peripheral nerve trunks, consisting of a condensation of areolar connective tissue; subdivided into those layers that surround the whole nerve trunk (epifascicular epineurium), and those layers that extend between the nerve fascicles (interfascicular epineurium). With the endoneurium and perineurium, the epineurium comprises the peripheral nerve stroma.
[epi- + G. neuron, nerve]

epineurium

(ĕp′ə-no͝or′ē-əm, -nyo͝or′-)
n. pl. epi·neuria (-no͝or′ē-ə, -nyo͝or′-)
The thick sheath of connective tissue surrounding a nerve trunk.

ep′i·neu′ri·al adj.

ep·i·neu·ri·um

(ep'i-nūr'ē-ŭm) [TA]
The outermost supporting structure of peripheral nerve trunks, consisting of a condensation of areolar connective tissue; subdivided into those layers that surround the whole nerve trunk (epifascicular epineurium), and those layers that extend between the nerve fascicles (interfascicular epineurium). With the endoneurium and perineurium, the epineurium comprises the peripheral nerve stroma.
[epi- + G. neuron, nerve]

epineurium

The connective tissue sheath of a nerve.

ep·i·neu·ri·um

(ep'i-nūr'ē-ŭm) [TA]
The outermost supporting structure of peripheral nerve trunks, consisting of a condensation of areolar connective tissue; subdivided into those layers that surround the whole nerve trunk (epifascicular epineurium), and those layers that extend between the nerve fascicles (interfascicular epineurium). With the endoneurium and perineurium, the epineurium comprises the peripheral nerve stroma.
[epi- + G. neuron, nerve]
References in periodicals archive ?
10): As NI3 at point of emergence after A 9 1 contained CFs 59"' a, b and c surrounded by internal epineurium, consisting of nerve fibers contributed by original CFs 14, 15, 16 and 20 so the fascicular tracking and correlation envisaged that these CFs underwent 5 splits, 3 fusions and 2 multiplexing.
The epineurium itself provides less donor site morbidity and the appropriate microenvironment permitting nerve regeneration.
The nerve was checked to ascertain that the epineurium was intact and that the nerve was completely crushed.
Within a smaller field of view it is possible to visualize anatomical details, such as the epineurium, the perineurium, and single fascicles, which otherwise would require a biopsy to be detected [15,16].
With axonotmesis, the Schwann cell, the epineurium, and perineurium remain intact.
(4) It was previously thought to be due to direct lymphatic spread into nerves, but this has subsequently been challenged, as lymphatic channels do not appear to penetrate the epineurium. Later, the nerve sheath was presumed to provide a low-resistance path for tumour spread.
In other words, the problem in CTS is not nerve fibers themselves but fibrosis developed on epineurium and perinerium, the connective tissues surrounding the nerve.
Vein conduit also leads to lower inflammatory cells to migrate, higher rate of axonal regeneration under neurotropism, and a thinner epineurium to regenerate [11-13].
After the crush, care was taken to preserve the epineurium, to facilitate regeneration of the nerves along their endoneural sheaths.
The large peripheral nerves are composed of Schwann cell-axon complexes, supported and protected by 3 connective-tissue sheaths: endoneurium, perineurium, and epineurium. The innermost sheath, the endoneurium, surrounds each of the axon-Schwann cell complexes.
Briefly, nerves were removed, stripped of epineurium, cut into thin slices from adult nerves and cultured in DMEM medium with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) for 14 days, changing the medium every 3 days.
Intraoperatively, multiple masses were found to be adherent to the facial nerve epineurium (figure 2, A).