epileptoid


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epileptiform

 [ep″ĭ-lep´tĭ-form]
1. resembling epilepsy or its manifestations.
2. occurring in severe or sudden paroxysms.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ep·i·lep·toid

(ep'i-lep'toyd),
Resembling epilepsy; denoting certain convulsions, especially of functional nature.
Synonym(s): epileptiform
[G. epilēpsia, seizure, epilepsy, + eidos, resemblance]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

epileptoid

(ĕp′ə-lĕp′toid′)
adj.
Resembling epilepsy or any of its symptoms.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ep·i·lep·toid

(ep'i-lep'toyd)
Resembling epilepsy; denoting certain convulsions, especially of functional nature.
Synonym(s): epileptiform.
[G. epilēpsia, seizure, epilepsy, + eidos, resemblance]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Quirk's insight that a great deal of maladaptive behavior might be epileptoid was reinforced by Jonas in ICTAL AND SUBICTAL NEUROSES, and by Alvarez in NERVES IN COLLISION.
Effects of diazepam on fentanyl-induced epileptoid EEG activity and increase of multineuronal firing in limbic and mesencephalic brain structures.
Other biological predictors for an elevated risk of alcohol-related violence suggested in the literature include prior brain damage, epileptoid temporal lobe dysfunction, and past episodes of pathological intoxication.
He attributed it equally to great men as well as "shamans, ...berserks, and magicians...who [are] subject to epileptoid seizures as a means of falling into trances." Contrasting charismatic authority with the other two types of authority, he explained:
(13) Most importantly, Charcot rigorously laid out the four consecutive stages of the hysterical attack, which was either preceded or accompanied by a hysterical "aura" (headaches, dizziness, etc.): First, epileptoid twitches; second, the grands mouvements of the body including the signature position of the hysterical attack, the body arched from head to foot (the arc de cercle); third, the attitudes passionelles, indicating words and movements accompanying hallucinations; and finally, the delire terminal, or cool-down stage.