inscription

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Related to epigraphy: Inscriptions

inscription

 [in-skrip´shun]
1. a mark or line.
2. the second part of a prescription, the part containing names and amounts of the ingredients.

in·scrip·tion

(in-skrip'shŭn),
1. The main part of a prescription, that which indicates the drugs and the amount of each to be used in the mixture.
2. A mark, band, or line.
Synonym(s): inscriptio
[L. inscriptio]

in·scrip·tion

(in-skrip'shŭn)
1. The main part of a prescription; that which indicates the drugs and the quantity of each to be used in the mixture.
2. A mark, band, or line.

in·scrip·tion

, inscriptio (in-skrip'shŭn, -shē-ō)
The main part of a prescription, which indicates drugs and amount of each to be used in the mixture.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the fourth chapter, "Entombed Epigraphy in an Era of Political Instability," Davis analyzes a number of "non-standard entombed epitaphs" (those lacking biographies, rhymed elegies, and/or titles) produced before the fifth century.
Though this book can only be used in combination with older handbooks to introduce students to Northwest Semitic epigraphy, it is an excellent companion for such works, updating them in important respects and giving students (and fellow scholars) a taste of the sorts of considerations that lead Rollston and others to identify and date their scripts in particular ways, Moreover, it serves the important purpose of giving expanded consideration of the historical, generic and social contexts of such inscriptions.
Angelos Chaniotis, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitat, Heidelberg: Greek epigraphy, Hellenistic religion and law
He proves these allegations by establishing their textual-semantic content in their use in Near Eastern and Egyptian epigraphy, associating them with several important intratextual functions in the Hebrew Bible.
155), so one should not between the epigraphy and the papyrology (p.
Petrucci's broad interests range from Latin epigraphy to the age of printing; he sets out a coherent theory of the development of what he calls "written culture" as a selfcontained, inherently conservative category of thought.
He also emphasizes the importance of epigraphy and iconography for a better and, perhaps, a more fundamental understanding of the development of Maya culture in general and Copan in particular.
At Bonn, Ritschl published, with Theodor Mommsen, the Priscae Latinitatis Monumenta Epigraphica (1862; "Epigraphical Records of Ancient Latin"), an edition of Latin inscriptions from the earliest times to the end of the Roman Republic; this work established Ritschl as one of the founders of modern epigraphy. His studies include papers on early Latin grammar and meter and on the manuscript tradition of Plautus.
Who can now seriously study Roman epigraphy, or social history, or prosopography, without having at hand Kajanto's Latin Cognomina (1965) or Solin's Die griechischen Personennamen in Rom (1982) or Solin's and Salomies's Repertorium Nominum Gentilium et Cognominum Latinorum (1988)?
Bengt Odenstedt reviews Richard Morris's book Runic and Mediterranean Epigraphy, with a refreshingly undogmatic mixture of reservation and admiration.
Her new book contains all of the virtues of the first, in terms of skilled interpretation of individual papyri and attention to minute points of detail, but moves beyond this sort of monographic approach to encompass a range of sources and methodologies which include archaeology, iconography, religion, epigraphy, literature, anthropology and sociology.