epiglottis


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Related to epiglottis: epiglottitis

epiglottis

 [ep″ĭ-glot´is]
the lidlike cartilaginous structure overhanging the entrance to the larynx. adj., adj epiglot´tic. The muscular action of swallowing closes the opening to the trachea by placing the larynx against the epiglottis. This prevents food and drink from entering the larynx and trachea, directing it instead into the esophagus. (See Plates.)
Epiglottis in a sagittal section of the head and neck. From Dorland's, 2000.

ep·i·glot·tis

(ep'i-glot'is), [TA]
A leaf-shaped plate of elastic fibrocartilage, covered with mucous membrane, at the root of the tongue, which serves as a diverter valve over the superior aperture of the larynx during the act of swallowing; it stands erect when liquids are being swallowed but is passively bent over the aperture by solid foods being swallowed.
[G. epiglōttis, fr. epi, on, + glōttis, the mouth of the windpipe]

epiglottis

(ĕp′ĭ-glŏt′ĭs)
n. pl. epi·glottises or epi·glottides (-glŏt′ĭ-dēz′)
The thin elastic cartilaginous structure located at the root of the tongue that folds over the glottis to prevent food and liquid from entering the trachea during the act of swallowing.

ep′i·glot′tal (-glŏt′l), ep′i·glot′tic (-glŏt′ĭk) adj.

ep·i·glot·tis

(ep'i-glot'is) [TA]
A leaf-shaped plate of elastic cartilage, covered with mucous membrane, at the root of the tongue, which serves as a diverter valve over the superior aperture of the larynx during the act of swallowing; it stands erect when liquids are being swallowed but is passively bent over the aperture by solid foods that are being swallowed.
[G. epiglōttis, fr. epi, on, + glōttis, the mouth of the windpipe]
Enlarge picture
EPIGLOTTIS

epiglottis

(ĕp″ĭ-glŏt′ĭs) plural.epiglottides [Gr.]
The uppermost cartilage of the larynx, located immediately posterior to the root of the tongue. It covers the entrance of the larynx when the individual swallows, thus preventing food or liquids from entering the airway. epiglottidean (-glŏ-tĭd′ē-ăn), adjective
See: illustration

epiglottis

A leaf-like cartilaginous structure, down behind the back of the tongue, which act as a kind of lid to cover the entrance to the voice-box (larynx) and prevent food or liquid entering it during the act of swallowing.
Epiglottisclick for a larger image
Fig. 151 Epiglottis . The left-side cervical region in humans.

epiglottis

a thin flexible structure, made of CARTILAGE, with a leaf-like shape that guards the entrance to the larynx (the glottis) and prevents food material entering the TRACHEA during swallowing, when the larynx is moved upwards under the epiglottis.

Epiglottis

A leaf-like piece of cartilage extending upwards from the larynx, which can close like a lid over the trachea to prevent the airway from receiving any food or liquid being swallowed.

ep·i·glot·tis

(ep'i-glot'is) [TA]
A leaf-shaped plate of elastic cartilage, covered with mucous membrane, at the root of the tongue, which serves as a diverter valve over the superior aperture of the larynx during the act of swallowing; it stands erect when liquids are being swallowed but is passively bent over the aperture by solid foods that are being swallowed.
[G. epiglōttis, fr. epi, on, + glōttis, the mouth of the windpipe]
References in periodicals archive ?
No case of malignant melanoma of the epiglottis has been published since 1991.
It extends upward between the false vocal fold, the base of the epiglottis, and the thyroid cartilage.
A lateral x-ray of the soft tissue of the neck revealed that a mass had arisen from the anterior surface of the epiglottis. The aryepiglottic folds and the arytenoids were normal on x-ray.
Spontaneous explusion of schwannoma of epiglottis. Indian J Otolaryng Head Neck Surg 1997;49:274-5.
The presented patient had a foreign body in the epiglottis, and it did not cause respiratory distress.
Our case illustrates physicians should be aware of the possibility of inappropriate cardiopulmonary resuscitation manipulation related acute epiglottis. In addition, there is urgent need to ensure the use of appropriate cardiopulmonary resuscitation maneuvers, especially in young children.
Blood clots were seen covering the pharyngeal walls, epiglottis, and arytenoids.
On ENT examination, indirect laryngoscopic examination revealed an ulcerative lesion over the epiglottis, arytenoids and interarytenoid area.
The epiglottis appeared swollen, although he did not complain of dyspnea (Figure 1(a)).
In the experimental test (Touch and Read method), the ETT was secured at a depth equal to the distance from the angle of the mouth to the epiglottis tip plus 12.5 cm in men and 11.5 cm in women.
The endoscope was then advanced caudally within the common meatus to reach pharynx, after which rima epiglottis was observed.