epidermis

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epidermis

 [ep″ĭ-der´mis] (pl. epider´mides) (Gr.)
the outermost and nonvascular layer of the skin, derived from the embryonic ectoderm, varying in thickness from 0.07 to 1.4 mm. On the palmar and plantar surfaces it comprises, from within outward, five layers: (1) basal layer (stratum basale), composed of columnar cells arranged perpendicularly; (2) prickle-cell or spinous layer (stratum spinosum), composed of flattened polyhedral cells with short processes or spines; (3) granular layer (stratum granulosum), composed of flattened granular cells; (4) clear layer (stratum lucidum), composed of several layers of clear, transparent cells in which the nuclei are indistinct or absent; and (5) horny layer (stratum corneum), composed of flattened, cornified, non-nucleated cells. In the epidermis of the general body surface, the clear layer is usually absent. adj., adj epider´mal, epider´mic.
Section of epidermis. From Dorland's, 2000.

ep·i·der·mis

, pl.

ep·i·derm·i·des

(ep'i-dĕrm'is, -derm'i-dēz), [TA]
1. The superficial epithelial portion of the skin (cutis). The thick epidermis of the palms and soles contains the following strata, from the surface: stratum corneum (keratin layer), stratum lucidum (clear layer), stratum granulosum (granular layer), stratum spinosum (prickle cell layer), and stratum basale (basal cell layer); in other parts of the body, the stratum lucidum and stratum granulosum may be absent.
2. In botany, the outermost layer of cells in leaves and the young parts of plants.
Synonym(s): cuticle (3) , cuticula (2) , epiderm, epiderma
[G. epidermis, the outer skin, fr. epi, on, + derma, skin]

epidermis

(ĕp′ĭ-dûr′mĭs)
n.
1. The outer, protective, nonvascular layer of the skin of vertebrates, covering the dermis.
2. An integument or outer layer of various invertebrates.
3. The outermost layer of cells covering the leaves and young parts of a plant.

ep′i·der′mal (-məl), ep′i·der′mic adj.

ep·i·der·mis

, pl. epidermides (epi-dĕrmis, -mi-dēz)
1. The superficial epithelial portion of the skin (cutis). The epidermis of the palms and soles has the following strata: stratum corneum (horny layer), stratum lucidum (clear layer), stratum granulosum (granular layer), stratum spinosum (prickle cell layer), and stratum basale (basal cell layer); in other parts of the body, the stratum lucidum may be absent.
2. botany The outermost layer of cells in leaves and the young parts of plants.
Synonym(s): cuticle (3) , cuticula (2) .
[G. epidermis, the outer skin, fr. epi, on, + derma, skin]

epidermis

The structurally simple outermost layer of the skin, containing no nerves, blood vessels, or hair follicles, and acting as a rapidly replaceable surface. The deepest layer of the epidermis is the basal cell layer. Above this is the ‘prickle cell’ layer. The epidermis is ‘stratified’, the layers of cells becoming flatter towards the surface. The outermost cells of the epidermis are dead and are continuously shed.

epidermis

  1. (in plants) the thin tissue, usually one cell thick, that surrounds young roots, stems and leaves. In stems and leaves the epidermal cells secrete a CUTICLE (1), in roots they do not. In older roots and stems the epidermis is often replaced by CORK tissue.
  2. (in animals) the outer layer of the skin derived from embryonic ECTODERM. In vertebrates, the epidermal layer is usually made up of stratified EPITHELIUM with an outer layer of dead cells which become ‘keratinized’ (see KERATIN forming a protective layer. The invertebrate epidermis is normally one cell thick and often forms a protective cuticle.

Epidermis

The outer layer of skin, consisting of a layer of dead cells that perform a protective function and a second layer of dividing cells.

ep·i·der·mis

, pl. epidermides (epi-dĕrmis, -mi-dēz)
[TA] The superficial epithelial portion of the skin (cutis).
[G. epidermis, the outer skin, fr. epi, on, + derma, skin]
References in periodicals archive ?
In the leaves, the epidermic cell walls presented anticlinal walls with sinuous juxtaposition (Figure 2a, 2c, 2d, 2e), which can increase the contact surface among adjacent cells and hinder the tissue disruption (Carvalho and Pires, 2008).
Expanding upon Freud's idea of "surface entity" (1961, page 26), Anzieu's insistence that the self is eminently epidermic has unfortunately not received the attention it deserves from anthropologists and border theorists.
The antibodies to HFRS virus could be detected in mononuclear cells, neutrophils, epidermic cells, and multinucleated giant cells, all of which had a greater ability to produce cellular factors.
The researchers have joined together these epidermic stem cells into skin created by means of bioengineering, and they have observed that the cells preserve the regenerative potential that they normally have in our skin.
Through anatomical observations, swollen epidermic cells were found when the explants were cultured on MS medium with BAP (Figure 1C), with subsequent nodule formation and direct regeneration from adventitious shoots (Figure 1D).
Inner wall of epidermic cells are thin; parenchyma composed of polyhedral cells; collateral bundles with a set of sclerenchyma fibers are located at the periphery, each collateral bundle includes two lateral strands of phloem, a central bundle composed of small strands of phloem surrounded with phloematic fibers, a large vessel of metaxylem, several small vessels of protoxylem and xylematic parenchyma.
Fernando's murmured "Te mataria" (46) anticipates Daniel's own decidedly elliptical "!Te voy a matar, te voy a matar!" (504), although the episode in Baroja conforms more closely to Villena's "epidermic" narrative than to Chacel's oblique eroticism.
The specimens were sought through night watches (close to deer tracks or streams) and attraction sites (using several food items or feces, urine and epidermic gland secretions from captive individuals).
MIC of Euxyl K 700 Species MIC Value (%) Gram-negative E-coli 0.313 Pseudomonas aeruginosa 0.313 Pseudomonas putida 0.156 Enterobacter gergoviae 0.625 Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus 0.313 Staphylococcus epidermic is 0.313 Molds Aspergillus niger 0.625 Penicillium funiculosum 0.156 Yeasts Candida albicans 0.313 Source: Schulke
[I]n our examination of left-wing politics today we have been superficial or, so to speak, epidermic [epidermiques].
Flower was the first to suggest that the animal was "not a pale variety of the ordinary elephant, as some have supposed the so-called 'White Elephant' to be, but one characterized by a local deficiency of the epidermic pigment." The elephant was not diseased, argued Flower, but it did manifest a birth "defect" approaching "albinism".