epidemiology


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epidemiology

 [ep″ĭ-de″me-ol´o-je]
the science concerned with the study of the factors determining and influencing the frequency and distribution of disease, injury, and other health-related events and their causes in a defined human population for the purpose of establishing programs to prevent and control their development and spread. Also, the sum of knowledge gained in such a study.
analytic epidemiology the second stage in an epidemiologic study, in which hypotheses generated in the descriptive phase are tested.
descriptive epidemiology the first stage in an epidemiologic study, in which a disease that has occurred is examined. Data necessary in this phase include time and place of occurrence and the characteristics of the persons affected. Tentative theories regarding the cause of the disease are advanced and a hypothesis is formulated.

ep·i·de·mi·ol·o·gy

(ep'i-dē'mē-ol'ŏ-jē),
The study of the distribution and determinants of health-related states or events in specified populations, and the application of this study to control of health problems.
[G. epidēmios, epidemic, + logos, study]

epidemiology

(ĕp′ĭ-dē′mē-ŏl′ə-jē, -dĕm′ē-)
n.
The branch of medicine that deals with the study of the causes, distribution, and control of disease in populations.

ep′i·de′mi·o·log′ic (-ə-lŏj′ĭk), ep′i·de′mi·o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
ep′i·de′mi·o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
ep′i·de′mi·ol′o·gist n.

epidemiology

The formal study of health event patterns in a population, their causes and means of prevention. Epidemiology provides the scientific basis for evidence-based medicine and strategies to improve public health.

epidemiology

1. The study of the distribution of disease and its impact upon a population, using such measures as incidence, prevalence, or mortality.
2. The study of the occurrence and causes of health effects in human populations.
3. The science of public health, which studies the frequency, distribution, and causes of diseases in a population–rather than in an individual, and examines the impact of social and physical factors in the environment on morbid conditions. See AIDS epidemiology, Analytical epidemiology, Cancer epidemiology, Clinical epidemiology, Developmental epidemiology, Intersecting epidemiology, Inverted epidemiology, Prospective epidemiology, Retrospective epidemiology.

ep·i·de·mi·ol·o·gy

(ep'i-dē'mē-ol'ŏ-jē)
The study of the distribution and determinants of health-related states or events in specified populations, and the application of this study to control of health problems.
[G. epidēmios, epidemic, + logos, study]

epidemiology

The study of the occurrence, in populations, of the whole range of conditions that affect health. It includes the study of the attack rate of the various diseases (incidence) and the number of people suffering from each condition at any one time (prevalence). Industrial and environmental health problems are also an important aspect of epidemiology.

epidemiology

the study of the incidence, distribution and control of an EPIDEMIC disease in a population.

epidemiology

A branch of health science that deals with the incidence, prevalence, distribution and aetiology of disease in a population.

ep·i·de·mi·ol·o·gy

(ep'i-dē'mē-ol'ŏ-jē)
Study of distribution and determinants of health-related states or events in specified populations and application of results to control health problems.
[G. epidēmios, epidemic, + logos, study]
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Bracken, professor and vice chairman of epidemiology and public health at the Yale School of Medicine, told The New York Times, "There are clusters of any kind of cancer," but "in Guilford, it's not even a cluster because the cancers aren't related.
Epidemiology capacity is essential for detection, control, and prevention of major public health problems.
Eras, paradigms, and the future of epidemiology. Am J Public Health 1996;86(5):621.
When he joined CDC in 1976, Thacker helped implement CDC's Field Epidemiology Training Programs in more than 30 countries.
"Fundamentals of Cancer Epidemiology" is a scholarly text examining this blight of mankind, and medical science's advancing knowledge of it.
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A current project follows up on findings from an epidemiological study published in the January 2002 American Journal of Epidemiology. In that study, researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles, found fairly strong correlations between maternal air pollution exposure during the first trimester of pregnancy and children being born with overt heart defects.
The contract is also known as Behavioral Epidemiology Assessment Research contract or BEAR.
The University of South Carolina's (USC) Arnold School of Public Health (SPH) is seeking applicants for a 9-month tenure-track faculty position in Epidemiology in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics.
Comprehensive in its coverage, this text is a full-scale, pedagogically rich introduction to fundamental ideas and procedures in epidemiology. It covers the major concepts, principles, methods, and applications of both conventional and modern epidemiology using clear language and frequent examples to illustrate important points and facilitate understanding.
During 2001-2009, the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) conducted four epidemiology capacity assessments (ECAs) in state and territorial public health departments in the United States (1-5).
This text describes the conceptual underpinnings of the science of epidemiology, addressing the methodological issues crucial to the wide range of epidemiologic applications in public health and medicine.

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