epidemiologist


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epidemiologist

 [ep″ĭ-de″me-ol´o-jist]
one who specializes in epidemiology.

ep·i·de·mi·ol·o·gist

(ep'i-dē'mē-ol'ŏ-jist),
An investigator who studies the occurrence of disease or other health-related conditions, states, or events in specified populations; one who practices epidemiology; the control of disease is usually also considered to be a task of the epidemiologist.

ep·i·de·mi·ol·o·gist

(ep'i-dē'mē-ol'ŏ-jist)
An investigator who studies the occurrence of disease or other health-related conditions, states, or events in specified populations; one who practices epidemiology; the control of disease usually is also considered a task of the epidemiologist.

ep·i·de·mi·ol·o·gist

(ep'i-dē'mē-ol'ŏ-jist)
An investigator who studies occurrence of disease or other health-related conditions, states, or events in specified populations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Seventy-two percent of EIP sites versus 83% of non-EIP sites reported having laboratory support 24 hours per day, whereas 75% of EIP sites compared to 43% of nonEIP sites reported having a dedicated enteric/foodborne epidemiologist. For these same two questions, 73% of small population states versus 100% of large and 90% of medium states had laboratory support 24 hours per day, and 75% of large and 80% of medium states had a dedicated enteric/foodborne disease epidemiologist compared to 30% of small population states.
In the eyes of an epidemiologist, the inability of each of the other studies to confirm one specific connection lowers the possibility of that connection being real.
Epidemiologists at the state and local level are primarily responsible for monitoring the health of their jurisdictional populations.
Through close collaboration between DPH information technology development staff and epidemiologists responsible for initiating the active monitoring program, the core functions of EAMS were developed and deployed in 6 days.
The field of infectious diseases is fast-moving, as new challenges around the world engage the efforts of physicians, epidemiologists, microbiologists, veterinarians, and social scientists to understand them well enough to control and prevent them.
"Coffee is not likely to be causing pancreatic cancer," concludes Debra Silverman, an epidemiologist at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland.
The epidemiology workforce was enumerated in late 2010 because 1) state budget cutting and federal stimulus funding might have affected the number of epidemiologists and 2) previous CSTE assessments included only the state-level workforce.
In babies, the immune system doesn't always identify bacterial sugar molecules as foreign, says Cynthia Whitney, an epidemiologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.
But "over fifty studies have found, with remarkable consistency, that diets rich in carotenoids are associated with lower risk of cancer at many sites," wrote Harvard University epidemiologists Walter Willett and Meir Stampfer in a 1995 letter to FDA commissioner David Kessler.
In 2002, the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) conducted its first national food safety epidemiology capacity assessment (1), which provided the basis for development of minimum performance standards to guide state and local foodborne disease control programs.
People with "bad diets" have the most to gain, says epidemiologist Barbara Howard of the nonprofit MedStar Research Institute in Hyattsville, Md., another of the trial's investigators.
For each patient, a trained epidemiologist completed a standardized data abstraction form that included patient demographics, illness history, and clinical characteristics.

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