epidemic polyarthritis

ep·i·dem·ic pol·y·ar·thri·tis

a mild febrile illness of humans in Australia characterized by polyarthralgia and rash, caused by the Ross River virus, a member of the family Togaviridae, and transmitted by mosquitoes.

ep·i·dem·ic pol·y·ar·thri·tis

(ep'i-dem'ik pol'ē-ahr-thrī'tis)
A mild febrile illness of humans in Australia characterized by polyarthralgia and rash, caused by the Ross River virus and transmitted by mosquitoes.
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References in periodicals archive ?
RRV is endemic to Australia, where it causes [approximately equal to] 5,000 cases of epidemic polyarthritis annually (1).
Other viral diseases like epidemic polyarthritis Rift Valley fever Ross River Fever St.
Epidemic polyarthritis has been known to be related to various mosquito-borne viral diseases (20).
The isolation of a third group A arbovirus in Australia, with preliminary observations on its relationship to epidemic polyarthritis. Aust J Sci 26:183-184 (1963).
Climate variability end transmission of epidemic polyarthritis [Letter].
RRV causes epidemic polyarthritis, with several thousand cases noted annually in Australia (1).
Therefore, we investigated travelers returning to Germany from Australia with epidemic polyarthritis resulting from RRV infection.
Ross River virus disease (also called epidemic polyarthritis) afflicts thousands of Australians each year with symptoms--joint pain, rash, fever, muscle pain, and fatigue--that may last from several weeks to years.
While both cases were highly clinically compatible with epidemic polyarthritis, and tests for Ross River virus-specific serum IgM antibody were positive in both, the first case is the most convincing serologically because seroconversion (i.e., a 4-fold titer change) in neutralization tests was also observed.
Ross River virus (Togaviridae: Alphavirus) infection (epidemic polyarthritis) in American Samoa.
Bob's first assignment with the Rockefeller Foundation in New York in 1954 was to study the etiology of "epidemic polyarthritis," a disease characterized by fever, arthralgia, and rash that occurred mainly during the summer in coastal regions of Australia.
The most common arbovirus causing human disease is Ross River virus, an alphavirus, which causes an epidemic polyarthritis. Although Ross River virus incidence has increased over the past decade, the virus is not emerging; its increased incidence is probably due to increased awareness and recognition by general practitioners, improved diagnostic reagents, and increasing encroachment of human habitation into or near wetlands and other areas conducive to mosquito breeding.