epidemic


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epidemic

 [ep″ĭ-dem´ik]
occuring suddenly in numbers clearly in excess of normal expectancy, in contrast to endemic or sporadic. The term is used especially of infectious diseases but is also applied to any disease, injury, or other health-related event occurring in such outbreaks.
epidemic hemorrhagic fever an acute infectious disease thought to be transmitted to humans by mites or chiggers; characteristics include fever, purpura, peripheral vascular collapse, and acute renal failure.

ep·i·dem·ic

(ep'i-dem'ik),
The occurrence in a community or region of cases of an illness, specific health-related behavior, or other health-related events clearly in excess of normal expectancy; the word is also used to describe outbreaks of disease in animals or plants. Compare: endemic, sporadic.
[epi- + G. dēmos, the people]

epidemic

/ep·i·dem·ic/ (ep″ĭ-dem´ik) occurring suddenly in numbers clearly in excess of normal expectancy.

epidemic

(ĕp′ĭ-dĕm′ĭk) also

epidemical

(-ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Spreading rapidly and extensively by infection and affecting many individuals in an area or a population at the same time: an epidemic outbreak of influenza.
2. Widely prevalent: epidemic discontent.
n.
1. An outbreak of a contagious disease that spreads rapidly and widely.
2. A rapid spread, growth, or development: an unemployment epidemic.

ep′i·dem′i·cal·ly adv.

epidemic

[-dem′ik]
Etymology: Gk, epi + demos, people
1 adj, affecting a significantly large number of people at the same time.
2 n, a disease that spreads rapidly through a demographic segment of the human population, such as everyone in a given geographic area, a military base, or similar population unit, or everyone of a certain age or sex, such as the children or women of a region.
3 n, a disease or event whose incidence is beyond what is expected. Compare endemic, epizootic, pandemic.

epidemic

adjective Referring to an epidemic noun The occurrence of more cases of a disease or illness than expected in a given community or region or among a specific group of people over a particular period of time; a wave of infections in a region by an organism with a short generation time; epidemics are usually heralded by an exponential rise in number of cases in time and a decline as susceptible persons are exhausted. See Hidden epidemic, Media epidemic, Pseudoepidemic, Tobacco epidemic. Cf Endemic, Pandemic.

ep·i·dem·ic

(ep'i-dem'ik)
The occurrence in a community or region of cases of an illness, specific health-related behavior, or other health-related events clearly in excess of normal expectancy.
Compare: endemic, sporadic
[epi- + G. dēmos, the people]

epidemic

The occurrence of a large number of cases of a particular disease in a given population within a period of a few weeks. Epidemics occur when a population contains many susceptible people. This is why epidemics often occur at intervals of several years.

epidemic

the occurrence of many cases of a disease within an area.

Epidemic

A situation where a large number of infections by a particular agent, such as a virus, develops in a short time. The agent is rapidly transmitted to many individuals.

epidemic

disease attacking many within a population simultaneously (number of cases per unit of time)

epidemic,

n disease outbreak that affects more individuals than expected in a population.

ep·i·dem·ic

(ep'i-dem'ik)
Occurrence in a community or region of cases of an illness, specific health-related behavior, or other health-related events clearly in excess of normal expectancy.
[epi- + G. dēmos, the people]

epidemic,

adj spreading rapidly and widely among many individuals in a single location or region; illnesses labeled epidemic are those that oc-cur beyond normal expectations and are usually traceable to a single source.

epidemic

a level of disease occurrence in an animal population which is significantly greater than usual; only occasionally present in the population, widely diffused and rapidly spreading. The disease is clustered in space and time. The word has common usage in veterinary science in preference to the more accurate, epizootic.

common source epidemic
see point epidemic (below).
epidemic curve
see epidemic curve.
epidemic diarrhea of infant mice
see murine epizootic diarrhea.
epidemic hyperthermia
poisoning by Neotyphodium (Acremonium) coenophialum; called also fescue summer toxicosis.
multiple event epidemic
when the epidemic begins at about the same time in a number of places, e.g. when a poisoned batch of feed is supplied to a number of farms.
point epidemic
when the epidemic begins at one central point, with a large number of animals coming in contact with the source over a short time; a very rapid form of spread with a number of cases presenting with the same stage of the disease at the one time, indicating the single source of the pathogen.
propagated epidemic, propagative epidemic, propagating epidemic
outbreaks in which the disease propagates in one or more initial cases and then spreads to others, a relatively slow method of spread.
epidemic tremor
epidemic typhus
see rickettsiaprowazeki.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, a wealthy man described the city of Guanajuato during the typhus epidemic of 1714, when crowds of poor persons gathered in the street to beg for food: "Walking on the streets it was common to find people reduced almost to their bare skeletons walking in bands.
Only in the last 5 years have we seen the initial acceleration of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in that country.
To anticipate epidemics, scientists with the International Medical Research Center of Franceville (CIRMF) in Gabon teamed with several academic institutions, government ministries, and international conservation groups.
Ministry of Health 1954) proposed that an influenza epidemic caused the elevated mortality, although those authors recognized that some deaths in the months after the smog could be related to the air pollution from the episode.
As part of her efforts to combat the fentanyl, heroin, and opioid epidemic, Senator Hassan helped introduce the Combating the Opioid Epidemic Act to invest $45 billion for prevention, detection, surveillance, and treatment of opioids.
A number of deaths have been recorded in hospitals in the capital Sanaa over the past two weeks as a result of the meningitis epidemic, one of the most infectious bacterial infections in humans and the disintegration of the immune system, which raised official and popular fears of the spread of the epidemic, which passes through oral secretions and spray and in association with people infected with the disease.
To add to the current knowledge, we studied meningitis outbreak dynamics in areas of Kombissiri district, Burkina Faso, that were most severely affected by the 2012 epidemic.
Established in 1996, the UNAIDS Country Office [UCO] in Pakistan is one of the leading advocates for the action on the Aids epidemic in the country.
The carefully chosen account of the five epidemics that emerged in South Africa over a few centuries following European conquests makes for fascinating reading.
Recently, McQuiston and colleagues reported the first known case of recrudescent typhus in a patient following prior southern flying squirrel-associated epidemic typhus years earlier.
THE AMERICAN PLAGUE: The Untold Story of Yellow Fever, the Epidemic That Shaped Our History
We all have choices to make in life, so as long as the AIDS epidemic exists, there's nothing I'd rather be doing than devoting my time to confronting it.