epidemic


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epidemic

 [ep″ĭ-dem´ik]
occuring suddenly in numbers clearly in excess of normal expectancy, in contrast to endemic or sporadic. The term is used especially of infectious diseases but is also applied to any disease, injury, or other health-related event occurring in such outbreaks.
epidemic hemorrhagic fever an acute infectious disease thought to be transmitted to humans by mites or chiggers; characteristics include fever, purpura, peripheral vascular collapse, and acute renal failure.

ep·i·dem·ic

(ep'i-dem'ik),
The occurrence in a community or region of cases of an illness, specific health-related behavior, or other health-related events clearly in excess of normal expectancy; the word is also used to describe outbreaks of disease in animals or plants. Compare: endemic, sporadic.
[epi- + G. dēmos, the people]

epidemic

(ĕp′ĭ-dĕm′ĭk) also

epidemical

(-ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Spreading rapidly and extensively by infection and affecting many individuals in an area or a population at the same time: an epidemic outbreak of influenza.
2. Widely prevalent: epidemic discontent.
n.
1. An outbreak of a contagious disease that spreads rapidly and widely.
2. A rapid spread, growth, or development: an unemployment epidemic.

ep′i·dem′i·cal·ly adv.

epidemic

adjective Referring to an epidemic noun The occurrence of more cases of a disease or illness than expected in a given community or region or among a specific group of people over a particular period of time; a wave of infections in a region by an organism with a short generation time; epidemics are usually heralded by an exponential rise in number of cases in time and a decline as susceptible persons are exhausted. See Hidden epidemic, Media epidemic, Pseudoepidemic, Tobacco epidemic. Cf Endemic, Pandemic.

ep·i·dem·ic

(ep'i-dem'ik)
The occurrence in a community or region of cases of an illness, specific health-related behavior, or other health-related events clearly in excess of normal expectancy.
Compare: endemic, sporadic
[epi- + G. dēmos, the people]

epidemic

The occurrence of a large number of cases of a particular disease in a given population within a period of a few weeks. Epidemics occur when a population contains many susceptible people. This is why epidemics often occur at intervals of several years.

epidemic

the occurrence of many cases of a disease within an area.

Epidemic

A situation where a large number of infections by a particular agent, such as a virus, develops in a short time. The agent is rapidly transmitted to many individuals.

ep·i·dem·ic

(ep'i-dem'ik)
Occurrence in a community or region of cases of an illness, specific health-related behavior, or other health-related events clearly in excess of normal expectancy.
[epi- + G. dēmos, the people]
References in periodicals archive ?
Like the spruce bark beetle, the mountain pine beetle is also indigenous to North America, global warming plays a hand in its infestation, and dead trees left after epidemics are a source of fuel that may cause wildfires unless removed.
Outside of an epidemic, these tests would probably have a positive predictive value of about 30% and a negative predictive value of 90% or greater.
This serotype was first detected in association with a 1994 dengue/DHF epidemic in Nicaragua.
However, the "sistas" decided not to wait and let AIDS become an epidemic among them and decided to educate themselves about HIV.
Type A is the most common and usually causes the most serious epidemics. Type B outbreaks also can cause epidemics, but the disease it produces generally is milder than that caused by type A.
Indeed, even when the NLGTF's own 1993 survey reflected a 14 percent decrease in hate crimes against gays and lesbians from previous surveys in six major cities, a spokesperson announced, "All the anecdotal evidence tells us this is still an out-of-control problem." Using the survey as her supporting evidence, an NLGTF representative told a congressional committee that "anti-gay violence clearly remains at epidemic proportions." Another NLGTF spokesperson characterized the study as proving that the gay community was "under siege - fighting an epidemic of violence."
Further complicating access to HIV-related information, the body of knowledge concerning the epidemic is growing exponentially.
"In connection with today's full NDRRMC council meeting, I, as the chairman of the NDRRMC, issued a memorandum circular subject, enjoining all member agencies to support the nationwide dengue epidemic response.
One year after the official declaration of the Ebola virus epidemic in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the disease progresses in the country and affects since the middle of this month of July the third most populous city, near Rwanda and which has a international Airport; Rubber.
The highly-populated city, however, was not among those that exceeded their epidemic thresholds.
The meningitis epidemic began in the capital Sana'a as the health system, which suffers from a lack of medicine and potential, is depleted, Yemen Press reported.
When people obtain more news about the epidemic, they will appropriately change their behavior in order to prevent infection, such as vaccination [8] and seeking medical services [9].