epicuticle


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Related to epicuticle: Procuticle

epicuticle

(ĕp′ĭ-kyo͞o′tĭ-kəl)
n.
The outermost layer of cuticle of an arthropod exoskeleton, composed mostly of wax.
References in periodicals archive ?
The thin cell membrane layer, also referred to as the epicuticle, consists of a protein matrix and a lipid layer which strongly contribute to the hydrophobicity and lubricity of virgin hair (Lodge 2006).
In addition, it was found that the epicuticle of elytra dragged along the crack direction on the fracture part, causing the fiber to separate from the substrate and many fiber films to be pulled out and broken.
The observations in this study showed that although the fungal tube-like penetrant structures directly penetrated the epicuticle and exocuticle, they never developed there, suggesting that locust epicuticle and exocuticle present more significant barriers to the fungus than endocuticle, even though this layer contains many chitin fiber sheets (Hajek & Leger 1994).
An arthropod completely covered in an almost impermeable epicuticle wax layer would have the great advantage of losing very little water through transpiration, but it would be unable to breathe because the oxygen molecule is larger than the water molecule.
Their epicuticle contains a wax layer, which prevents water movement through the cuticle.
Produced by the underlying epidermal cells, the cuticle is composed of four layers (from outer to inner): epicuticle, exocuticle, endocuticle, and membranous layer (Travis and Friberg, 1963b; Raz et al.
A new technique for examining the exomorphology of the scorpion epicuticle is described that utilizes the fluorescent property of scorpion cuticle.
These cells apparently secrete the pharyngeal cuticular intima, consisting of three layers: the lamellate endocuticle, the exocuticle with trabeculae-bound spaces and the thin epicuticle lining the luminal surface.
This thinning of the cuticle often leads to the disappearance of the epicuticle, the external layer of the integument, a monomolecular layer of waxes that waterproofs the animal's body, reducing transpiration and thus water loss.
In addition, the erosion of the shell appears to be the result of bacterial degradation of the interstitial matrix of the epicuticle (Smolowitz et al.
The role of bacteria in the progression of lesion development was indicated by bacteria found embedded in shallow pits along the epicuticle (Fig.
Their epicuticle contains a wax layer which prevents water movement through the cuticle.