epicondyle


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to epicondyle: lateral epicondyle, Medial epicondyle

epicondyle

 [ep″ĭ-kon´dīl]
an eminence upon a bone, above its condyle.

ep·i·con·dyle

(ep'i-kon'dīl), [TA]
A projection from a long bone near the articular extremity above or upon the condyle.
Synonym(s): epicondylus [TA]
[epi- + G. kondylos, a knuckle]

epicondyle

(ĕp′ĭ-kŏn′dĭl, -dl)
n.
A rounded projection at the end of a bone, located on or above a condyle and usually serving as a place of attachment for ligaments and tendons.

ep·i·con·dyle

(ep'i-kon'dīl) [TA]
A projection from a long bone near the articular extremity above or on the condyle.
Synonym(s): epicondylus [TA] .
[epi- + G. kondylos, a knuckle]

Epicondyle

A projection on the surface of a bone; often an area for muscle and tendon attachment.
Mentioned in: Tennis Elbow
References in periodicals archive ?
Besides, the dorsoepicondylar medial muscle is described in comparative anatomy as being common to all quadruped mammals (Leche, 1900, apud Haninek et al., 2009), in which it is in complete form, that is, detached from the lower anterior edge of the latissimus dorsi muscle near its insertion tendon, passing like an arch through the axilla and descending into the arm in the plane of the medial intermuscular septum, where it ends inserted in the medial epicondyle of the humerus (Haninec et al.).
An anatomic descriptive study of 171 plain films of normal distal humeri of children aged 4 to 15 years demonstrated that the average location of the center of the intact medial epicondyle on AP radiographs is 0.5 mm below the olecranon fossa line and 1.2 mm anterior to the posterior humeral line in lateral radiographs.
(14) reported a FCUM that possessed only a humeral head; another muscle belly originating from medial epicondyle lying between flexor digitorum superficialis and FCUM and was attached to triquetral, hamate bones, and flexor retinaculum.
Plain radiography and computed tomography at three months after the injury showed that the avulsion fracture of the lateral epicondyle became displaced and malunited, the radiohumeral joint had widened on the anteroposterior view, and the posterior subluxation of the radial head had widened on the lateral view (Figures 2(a)-2(e)).
There is electrophysiologic evidence on this examination of a severe right ulnar nerve mononcuropathy at the elbow proximal to the olecranon/medial epicondyle and proximal to the innervation of the right FCU; axonal greater than dcmyclinating neuropathic process affecting motor and to a lesser extent sensory fibers; and a mixture of acute and chronic denervation in the right 1st Dl, ADM, and FCU.
Fracture locations Fracture location Number Percent proximal femur 11 1.20% femur shaft 66 7.17% distal femur 13 1.41% proximal tibia 29 3.15% tibal shaft 62 6.74% distal tibia 82 8.91% distal fibula 32 3.48% metatarsal bone 9 0.98% total lower extremity 304 33.04% clavicle 80 8.70% proximal humerus 31 3.37% humeral shaft 36 3.91% distal humerus lateral condyle 16 1.74% distal humerus medial epicondyle 22 2.39% distal humerus supracondylar 74 8.04% ulnar shaft 46 5.00% proximal ulna 14 1.52% distal ulna 29 3.15% proximal radius 22 2.39% radial shaft 62 6.74% distal radius 114 12.39% metacarpal bone 37 4.02% finger 33 3.59% total upper extremity 616 66.96% total 920 100.00% Table 4.
Mean Sonographic measurements (CSA) of ulnar nerve at three levels in controls and leprosy patients Above ME At Cubital Tunnel Control Group 4.08 + 0.14 4.55 + 0.02 Patient Group 12.52 [+ or -] 1.67 8.94 [+ or -] 0.64 Below ME Control Group 4.00 + 0.13 Patient Group 5.35 [+ or -] 0.26 CSA: Cross Sectional area, ME: Medial Epicondyle. Table 4.
A line was drawn between lateral epicondyle and distal radioulnar joint.
At first, the acromion process, lateral epicondyle of the humerus and the middle part of wrist were identified and the longitudinal axes of arm and forearm were determined.
Ulnar nerve is prone to injuries due to its anatomical topography, especially at the elbow, where it passes behind the medial epicondyle to the groove between olecranon and the medial epicondyle of the humerus.
Now, one K-wire was put from below the lateral epicondyle across the fracture line into proximal fragment obliquely so as to engage the medial cortex of the proximal fragment, and the second K-wire was put from below the medial epicondyle across the fracture into the proximal fragment so as to engage the lateral cortex.
For radio-ulnar fracture incision from medial epicondyle of humerus to styloid process of radius.