epicanthus

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epicanthus

 [ep″ĭ-kan´thus]
a vertical fold of skin on either side of the nose, sometimes covering the inner canthus; a normal characteristic in persons of certain races, but anomalous in others. adj., adj epican´thal, epican´thic.
Epicanthus. From Dorland's, 2000.

pal·pe·bro·na·sal fold

[TA]
a fold of skin extending from the root of the nose to the medial termination of the eyebrow, overlapping the medial angle of the eye; its presence is normal in fetal life and in some Asians.

epicanthus

/epi·can·thus/ (-kan´thus) a vertical fold of skin on either side of the nose, sometimes covering the inner canthus; a normal characteristic in persons of certain races, but anomalous in others.epican´thalepican´thic

epicanthus

(ĕp′ĭ-kăn′thəs)
n. pl. epican·thi (-thī, -thē)

epicanthus

[ep′ikan′thəs]
Etymology: Gk, epi + kanthos, lip of a vessel
a vertical fold of skin over the angle of the inner canthus of the eye. It may be slight or marked, covering the canthus and the caruncle. It is a hereditary trait in Asian people and is of no clinical significance. Some infants with Down syndrome have marked epicanthal folds. Also called epicanthal fold, epicanthic fold. epicanthal, epicanthic, adj.

epicanthus

A condition in which the margin of the upper eyelid curves round and downwards on the inner side so as to conceal the inner corner of the eye. Epicanthus is common in babies and may cause an illusory appearance of in-turning of the eye (convergent STRABISMUS).

epicanthus

A condition in which a fold of skin that stretches from the upper to the lower eyelid partially covers the inner canthus. It is normal in the fetus, in Down's syndrome and in many infants, especially of oriental origin, where it may give the impression of a convergent strabismus (pseudoesotropia). The condition is normally bilateral. As the bridge of the nose develops, the folds eventually disappear. Syn. epicanthal fold. See apparent strabismus.

epicanthus

a vertical fold of skin on either side of the nose.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinical features of the patients of down's syndrome were confirmed by presence of macroglossia, opened mouth, epicanthic fold, short and square nose oblique palpebral fissure and malformed ear (Fig 3).
Comparison of physical features in children with Down syndrome and hypothyroidism * Down syndrome Head Brachycephaly, intermediate fontanelle Tongue Protruding Nasal bridge Underdeveloped Eyes Upslanted palpebral fissures, epicanthic folds, Brushfield spots (in blue eyes) Neck Short Heart Murmur (mainly atrioventricular canal defect) Abdomen Umbilical hernia Neuromuscular Hypotonia Skin Dry Extremities Short hands and feet, transverse palmar crease, clinodactyly, wide sandal gaps, hyperextensible joints Hypothyroidism Head Normal Tongue Large Nasal bridge Underdeveloped Eyes Normal Neck Short Heart Murmur (often nonspecific) Abdomen Umbilical hernia Neuromuscular Hypotonia Skin Dry Extremities Short hands and feet * Adapted from Coleman.
5,8 The presence of an extra copy of the proximal part of q21, q22 appears to result in the typical physical phenotype of mental retardation, brachycephaly, hypotonia, flat facies, slanted palpebral fissures, epicanthic folds, brush field spots on the iris, relatively large protruding tongue, small low set ears and hand anomalies (short and broad hand, clino-dactyly of the fifth finger, Simian crease).
Table 1: Comparison of Chinese and Japanese facial features (64) Chinese face Japanese face parchment yellow complexion earthy yellow complexion more frequent epicanthic fold less frequent epicanthic fold higher bridge [on nose] flatter nose never has rosy cheeks sometimes rosy cheeks scant beard heavy beard longer, narrower face broader, shorter face lighter facial bones massive cheek and jawbone
On the novel's first pages we encounter "those ideal, surgically created Y-S faces--blond hair, blue eyes with epicanthic folds, painted brows like Hokusai brash strokes, aquiline nose, dark golden complexion" (1-2).
The Mongols are clearly Asiatic, Mongoloid, with dark eyes, the distinctive epicanthic fold of the upper eyelid, scarce body hair, and dark hair that retains its color until very late in life.
On clinical examination, the face showed characteristic potter facies-micrognathia, hypertelorism, epicanthic folds, snubbed nose, and low set ears.
Some of the least technologically developed tribes in southeast Asia and the Philippines (such as the Aeta in Luzon) are members of the Negrito local race; the individuals are small, with dark skin and very frizzy hair often have the epicanthic fold so typical of Mongoloid peoples.
The Mongoloid facial characteristics these peoples share reveal their Asian origin: a relatively broad, flattened face, with prominent cheekbones, and often with an epicanthic fold (the fold in the upper eyebrow that is the reason for the typical slanting eyes of the Mongoloids); dark eyes and hair; low or medium stature; a rounded body; and a sparse beard and moustache.