epiblepharon

epiblepharon

 [ep″ĭ-blef´ah-ron]
a developmental anomaly in which a horizontal fold of skin stretches across the border of the eyelid, pressing the lashes against the eyeball.

ep·i·bleph·a·ron

(ep'i-blef'ă-ron),
A congenital horizontal skin fold near the margin of the eyelid, caused by abnormal insertion of muscle fibers. In the upper lid, it simulates blepharochalasis; in the lower lid, it causes a turning inward of the lashes.
[epi- + G. blepharon, eyelid]

ep·i·bleph·a·ron

(ep-i-blef'ă-ron)
A congenital horizontal skin fold near the margin of the eyelid, caused by abnormal insertion of muscle fibers. In the upper lid, it simulates blepharochalasis; in the lower lid, it causes a turning inward of the lashes.
[epi- + G. blepharon, eyelid]

epiblepharon

A congenital anomaly in which a fold of skin lies across the upper or lower lid margin. In the lower eyelid it causes a turning inward of the eyelashes without causing entropion. The condition commonly resolves itself with facial growth. See blepharochalasis; con-genital entropion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Distribution of ocular and, systemic and craniofacial anomalies with epiphora n Down's syndrome 2 Craniosynostosis 1 Apert syndrome 1 Mild cranial anomalies 1 Total 5 Other Ocular Anomalies Telecanthus 6 Epiblepharon 1 Iridofundal coloboma 1 Lid coloboma 1 Total 9 Table 3.
For two cases of epiblepharon in a 19 and a 23-month-old, the authors placed the gel in the plane of the lower eyelid retractors, where it is believed that it would stretch the posterior lamella thus rotating the eyelid margin and lashes into a normal orientation.
To examine the demographic characteristics, clinical features, surgical outcomes, and long-term prognoses of epiblepharon in Korean children.
Epiblepharon is a relatively common eyelid anomaly frequently found in Asian infants and children.
Compared to Caucasians, Asians generally have nasal bones that tend to rise at a later age, and it has been reported that 12.6% of Asian children aged 7 to 14 years old have epiblepharon. The condition does not always correct itself with age, and surgical correction should be performed once symptoms appear [6].
Despite numerous studies examining the prevalence of epiblepharon in Asian populations [12-14], no large-scale, long-term studies on epiblepharon in Korean infants and children have been previously performed.
Among our patients, 768 patients were diagnosed with epiblepharon, underwent corrective surgery between January 2005 and December 2013, and were followed for at least 6 months following surgery.
Patient medical records were retrospectively reviewed for the age, gender, chief complaint, presence of keratitis, location of epiblepharon, concomitant disorders, postoperative location of epiblepharon, complications, and recurrence rate.
During the follow-up period, the patients were carefully monitored for surgical complications and epiblepharon recurrence.
Among the 768 epiblepharon patients included, 302 (39.3%) were male and 466 (60.7%) were female.
Epiblepharon correction surgery was performed on both the upper and lower lids of 82 patients (10.5%), on the lower lids of 629 patients (80.3%), and on the upper lids of 72 patients (9.2%, Table 1).
The remaining 28 patients (3.6%) had epiblepharon recurrence involving the lower lid, 15 (1.9%) of whom were operated on a second time.