ephyra

(redirected from ephyrae)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.
Related to ephyrae: severity, errand

ephyra

the free-swimming larva of a COELENTERATE jellyfish that results from STROBILATION of a scyphistoma larva (see SCYPHOZOAN).
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Although Mianzan (1989a) specifically stated that polyps have not been found in the wild, the presence of ephyrae suggests they should be located nearby at the Bahia Blanca harbor.
Prior to dissection, ephyrae and adults were relaxed in a 1:2 mixture of isotonic Mg[Cl.sub.2] (0.33 mol [l.sup.-1]) and seawater.
After SLS-1 returned to Earth, Spangenberg and her co-workers examined the jellyfish ephyrae that had developed in space.
Phyllosomas at all stages were tested ibr their feeding on ephyrae, young medusae, and medusae of Aurelia aurita.
- - - Proboscidactyla 91 4.8 1.0 ornata Proboscidactyla 17 0.9 0.2 stellata Rophalonema velatum 475 25.0 5.4 Sarsia coccometra 4 0.2 0.1 Solmundella 278 14.6 3.1 bitentaculata Total 8652 Scyphomedusae Chrysaora plocamia * - - - Ephyrae 21 1.1 0.2 Spring Species Frequency Total abundance Mean abundance (%) (ind 1000 (ind 1000 [m-.sup.3]) [m-.sup.3]) Hydromedusae Amphinema rugosum - 221 9.6 Amphogona apicata 42 9242 401.8 Bougainvillia - 170 7.4 macloviana * Bougainvillia 84 43752 1902.3 muscoides Bougainvillia 74 4893 212.7 muscus Bougainvillia sp.
The issue of size-dependence is important because small ephyrae (several millimeters in bell diameter) grow to substantially larger adult medusae (many centimeters in bell diameter; e.g., Kawahara et al., 2006), changing the Reynolds number of the flows around the medusae substantially.
An understanding of feeding by juvenile scyphomedusae, or ephyrae, is a prerequisite for an understanding of survival, growth, and planktonic impact of scyphomedusan populations.
Young ephyrae and hydromedusae can be injured or eaten by other members of the polyp colony.
Typically with 16 tentacles, alternating shorter and longer; number of tentacles highly varied, often corresponding to symmetry of parent medusae, parent polyp, or offspring ephyrae. At Friday Harbor, Washington, and Santa Cruz Island, California, scyphistomae typically with 20 tentacles.
One example is the process of strobilation in symbiotic scyphozoans such as Mastigias (Sugiura, 1964) and Cassiopeia (Colley and Trench, 1985); these jellyfish produce ephyrae only in the presence of Symbiodinium.
Aurelia has a typical bipartite scyphozoan life history in which benthic scyphopolyps asexually strobilate ephyrae that grow into sexual medusae, the females of which brood larvae that settle into the shallow coastal benthos within a few days of being released.