ephemeral

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ephemeral

(ĭ-fĕm′ər-əl)
adj.
1. Lasting for a markedly brief time: "There remain some truths too ephemeral to be captured in the cold pages of a court transcript" (Irving R. Kaufman).
2. Having a short lifespan or a short annual period of aboveground growth. Used especially of plants.
n.
Something, especially a plant, that is ephemeral.

e·phem′er·al′i·ty, e·phem′er·al·ness n.
e·phem′er·al·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ephemeral

(ĕ-fĕm′ĕr-ăl) [Gr. epi, on, + hemera, day]
Of brief duration.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

ephemeral

(of organisms such as many desert plants) having a very short life cycle. The term is used specifically to describe those plants that have more than one generation a year, as opposed to ANNUAL, BIENNIAL, PERENNIAL.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
This beautiful spring ephemeral is also very fragrant.
The best time to see the ephemerals at Garden in the Woods begins in April, when the site reopens to the public for the spring and summer.
Tom Smarr, director of horticulture, enjoys the "welcoming of spring" that ephemerals bring to the gardens.
A nice way to start the spring off early (besides prepping your green thumb by reading gardening books) is to plant some of your own ephemerals to enjoy.
Study sites were subject to severe ephemeral erosion and were representative of regional soil and cropping patterns (corn and soybeans).
During the summer of the 1988 drought, rainstorms were not sufficiently intense or persistent to produce ephemeral erosion.
Finally, we included a parameter that described the shortest horizontal distance from the location of interest to a known ephemeral channel position.
My favorite ephemeral is Mertensia virginica, or Virginia bluebells.
This is especially true with the spring ephemerals.
Some of the spring ephemerals reproduce clonally by underground structures (rhizomes or stolons).
Toss though you may, journalism is no longer ephemeral. Each work of the Times and more than 70 other North American newspapers and dozens of magazines are now preserved in vast computer databases such as Nexis, Vu/Text and Data Times.
The unique qualities of electronic text retrieval derive from the fact that each word, "ephemeral" included, is made an index term much like one found at the back of a non-fiction book.