ephemeral fever

e·phem·er·al fe·ver

a febrile episode lasting no more than a day or two.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

e·phem·er·al fe·ver

(e-femŏr-ăl fēvĕr)
Febrile episode lasting no more than a day or two.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
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Overall prevalence of bovine ephemeral fever (BEF) in indigenous breeds of bovine was 63.33%, lower, than exotic breeds 64.66% which were found to be more prone to disease.
The number of dead animals left by Mekunu were approximately 399 tons and the number of dead animals collected after Luban were estimated at 155 tons." Beah added In November 2018, the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries confirmed that it found cases of bovine ephemeral fever and Lumpy Skin Disease in some cattle in Oman, but stressed that the situation is under control.
Sero-survey on Aino, Akabane, Chuzan, bovine ephemeral fever and Japanese encephalitis virus of cattle and swine in Korea.
The ministry also confirmed that experts have monitored some cases of cattle deaths which occurred because of Three day sickness (bovine ephemeral fever) and Lumpy skin disease.
Bovine ephemeral fever is an economically important viral disease of cattle and buffalo.
In the seminar, lectures were delivered on Congo Fever, Bovine Trypanosomiasis, Bovine Ephemeral Fever, etc.
Some species transmit filarial nematodes, whereas others vector several economically important viral diseases such as Oropouche, blue-tongue, equine encephalitis, epizootic hemorrhagic disease, African horse sickness, Akabane and bovine ephemeral fever (Mellor et al.
This study was done on 50 Healthy and 50 infected to ephemeral fever female Holstein cows at a range of 4-6 years old and weight of 370-500 from different industrial farms in Hamadan province (Iran).
Genome organization and transcription strategy in the complex GNS-L intergenic region of bovine ephemeral fever rhabdovirus.
A real-time RT quantative (q) PCR for the detection of bovine ephemeral fever virus.
Arthropods biting cattle during an epizootic of ephemeral fever in 1968.
All classical endemic and emerging viruses, such as pestiviruses, bovine herpesvirus type 1, foot-and-mouth disease virus, bluetongue virus, epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus, Rift Valley fever virus, and bovine ephemeral fever virus, could be excluded as the causative agent.