ephemera


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ephemera

(ĭ-fĕm′ər-ə)
n.
A plural of ephemeron.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the spring ephemera reproduce clonally by underground structures (rhizomes or stolons).
The contributions to the ephemera special issue come from a range of scholars, some working in anarchist studies, others in CMS.
Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat--all of these different types of social media are good examples of ephemera. While it's possible for words and images on these sites to stick around, most are only seen once before being replaced by something new.
The book and ephemera fair runs from 11am to 5pm at the Harborne Road venue.
The Black Fives also features a variety of vintage African-American basketball ephemera, such as newspaper broadsheets and clippings, scrapbooks, game placards and flyers, such as a 1943 official souvenir program for the "5th Annual World's Championship Basketball Tournament"; 1912 "Pittsburgh vs.
Samuel Johnson's description in 1751 of the 'papers of the day' (referring to newspapers and pamphlets) as the Ephemerae of learning', has been cited as the earliest example of the application of 'ephemera', meaning something that has a transitory existence, to printed matter.
11-20 in the Main State Exhibit Hall and feature thousands of used books, paintings, art objects, textiles, stamps, coins, postcards, CDs, DVDs, maps, ephemera and more.
The culmination of bibliographer Roger Jackson's influential career, Henry Miller: His Life in Ephemera, 1914-1980 contains 832 pages of rare photographs, facsimile letters, publicity material, legal documents, broadsides, and other curiosities.
John and Heather Gilkes have had a sort out and created Ephemera - helpfully described on the exhibition invitation as "items designed to be useful or important for only a short time".
The multiyear global digitization project features a collection of rare primary source content, including newspapers, monographs, manuscripts, maps, and ephemera, from the "long" 19th century, ranging from 1789 to 1914.
Other lots include Boro programmes from the 1920s-40s, autographs, handbooks, 1966 World Cup ephemera, medals, badges and tickets.