excrescence

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Related to epenthesis: Anaptyxis, Svarabhakti

excrescence

 [ek-skres´ens]
an abnormal outgrowth; a projection related to a disease or pathologic condition. adj., adj excres´cent.

ex·cres·cence

(eks-kres'ens),
Any outgrowth from a surface.
[L. ex- cresco, pp. -cretus, to grow forth]

excrescence

(ĭk-skrĕs′əns)
n.
1. An outgrowth or enlargement, especially an abnormal one, such as a wart.
2. A usually unwanted or unnecessary accretion: "Independent agencies were an excrescence on the Constitution" (Los Angeles Times).

ex·cres·cence

(eks-kres'ĕns)
Any outgrowth from a surface.
[L. ex-cresco, pp. -cretus, to grow forth]

excrescence

Any projection of abnormal tissue from a surface, such as a wart, heart valve vegetations or a nasal polyp.
References in periodicals archive ?
Satisfaction of the ONSET constraint does not always necessitate epenthesis. On the contrary, SA resorts to epenthesis only when other choices fail to work.
The e may be due to epenthesis, compare Niya documents kareti, Prakrit karei, karai 'does' and Tirahi present tense karem, [??]es, [??]e.
Additionally, future research may be suggested to investigate opaque stress patterns in JA, if any, which involve interaction with syncope, epenthesis or vowel quality.
Divided into prothesis (word-initial, as in the <e> of "establish," from Latin "stabilire"), epenthesis (qv.--medial), and paragoge (final, as in the <st> of "amongst").
Evans, "Time series epenthesis: clustering time series streams requires ignoring some data," in Proceedings of the IEEE 11th International Conference on Data Mining (ICDM '11), pp.
Several morphophonological processes are at work, especially in the verbal domain, such as voicing, epenthesis and several assimilation processes.
Harrikari (2000) has presented a complementary and partially opposing view on identity group interpretation, using the optimality theory of generative phonology as the framework and considering dialectic epenthesis, gemination, and language games as examples.
Three years later, Couper (2006) conducted a study focusing on epenthesis (inserting an extra sound) and absence (dropping a sound) in L2-learners' speech.