eosinopenia


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Related to eosinopenia: basophilia, lymphocytosis, neutrophilia, basopenia

eosinopenia

 [e″o-sin″o-pe´ne-ah]
abnormal deficiency of eosinophils in the blood.

e·o·sin·o·pe·ni·a

(ē'ō-sin-ō-pē'nē-ă),
The presence of eosinophils in an abnormally small number in the peripheral bloodstream.
Synonym(s): hypoeosinophilia
[eosino(phil) + G. penia, poverty]

e·o·sin·o·pe·ni·a

(ē'ō-sin-ō-pē'nē-ă)
An abnormally small number of eosinophils in the peripheral bloodstream.
[eosino(phil) + G. penia, poverty]
References in periodicals archive ?
The optimal cutoff point for eosinopenia determined by Youden's index in this study is [less than or equal to]20/mcl; while eosinopenia showed the lowest sensitivity among the five biomarkers included in our study, it showed the highest specificity (53.1% and 76.8%, respectively).
As such, eosinopenia is expected in a number of clinical conditions including bloodstream infections, viral infections, therapy with corticosteroids and catecholamines and physiological stress (16-18).
observed that both sustained eosinopenia and a high neutrophil to lymphocyte count ratio were independent markers of mortality in patients with bacteremia [8].
Eosinophilia is a useful marker for infection and eosinopenia is correlated with a poor clinical outcome in fulminant infection." Defective T -cell responses coupled with autoinfection cycles account for heavy worm burdens in some immunosuppressed individuals and lead to hyperinfection syndrome and disseminated strongyloidiasis.
A decrease in the eosinophil count (eosinopenia) is seen with an increase in adrenal steroids (stress, shock, etc.) or adrenocortical hyperfunction (Corbett, 2000; Kee, 1999).
Other consequences of glucocorticoid release, such as neutrophilia, lymphopenia, and eosinopenia (stress leucogram), could have developed by the time the blood samples were collected.
Stress-induced corticosteroids inhibit immune function further by also causing eosinopenia, T-cell blastogenesis, granulocytosis, and inhibited basophil, mast cell, and neutrophil function.[45] Increased levels of cortisol have also been associated with decreased lymphocyte resonse to mitogen stimulation and diminished ability to destroy foreign cells.[55] Patients who undergo neurological surgery often receive exogenous corticosteroids and consequently end up with immunosuppression.
Dentro de los efectos colaterales mas sobresalientes indicados por Kemmerlin [34] y Van Der KolK [71], son dignos de mencionar: la gluconeogenesis, a partir de la grasa y de las proteinas tisulares; la hiperglicemia; la glucosuria; la eosinopenia; retencion de sodio; edema; perdidas de potasio, (debido a la poliurea) y la polidipsia.
in 39 (76.47%), Leucocytosis in 7 (13.73%) and Leukopenia in 5 (9.8%), whereas normal Absolute Eosinophil Count were seen in 47 (92.16%) and Eosinopenia in 4 (7.84%).
BRYANS (1955) studied horses experimentally infected with the incidental (non-adapted) serovar Pomona and detected leucocytosis, neutrophilia, eosinopenia, and lymphopenia, in addition to high serum bilirubin concentrations and albuminuria.
The classic clinical picture of kala-azar includes fever, cachexia, hepato-splenomegaly (splenomegaly usually predominates), pancytopenia (anemia, thrombocytopenia and leucopenia, with neutropenia, marked eosinopenia, and a relative lymphocitosis and monocytosis), and hypergammaglobulinemia (mainly IgG from polyclonal B-cell activation) with hypoalbuminemia [1,5].