eosin

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Related to eosine: methylene blue, Betadine

eosin

 [e´o-sin]
any of a class of rose-colored stains or dyes, all being bromine derivatives of fluorescein; eosin Y, the sodium salt of tetrabromofluorescein, is much used in histologic and laboratory procedures.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

e·o·sin

(ē'ō-sin),
A derivative of fluorescein used as a fluorescent acid dye for cytoplasmic stains and counterstains in histology and in Romanowsky-type blood stains.
[G. ēōs, dawn]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

eosin

(ē′ə-sən)
n.
1. A yellowish-red crystalline powder, C20H8 Br4O5, used in textile dyeing and ink manufacturing, as a biological stain, and in coloring gasoline.
2. Any of a group of red fluorescent bromine derivatives of fluorescein, or their sodium or potassium salts, used in ink manufacturing, textile dyeing, and in biology to stain cells.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

e·o·sin

(ē'ō-sin)
A fluorescent acid dye used for cytoplasmic stains and counterstains in histology and in Romanowsky-type blood stains.
[G. ēōs, dawn]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

eosin

A red dye commonly used to stain bacteria or tissue slices, for microscopic examination.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

eosin

a rose-pink fluorescent dye, the soluble potassium salt being used in microscopic staining.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

e·o·sin

(ē'ō-sin)
Fluorescent acid dye used for cytoplasmic stains and counterstains in histology.
[G. ēōs, dawn]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
After 5 hours of incubation the nutrient agar, Eosine methyline blue (EMB) agar and MacConkey agar were used for isolation and differentiation (Fig.
coli were characterized by growing on Eosine Methylene Blue (EMB) agar.
This family originated in the south Himalayan region of Indian subcontinent some 50 million years ago, during the early Eosine epoch (Bohme, 2004).
coli were analyzed us ing Eosine Methylene Blue (EMB) agar plates and Lactose broth with Durham tube [19].
Sections (~5-6 [micro]m) were mounted on glass slides and stained with Harris hematoxylin and eosine Y/floxine B procedure.
The gram negative Escherichia coli was identified on the basis of its growth characteristics on MacConky agar, Eosine Methylene Blue agar and finally confirmed by biochemical tests viz Enterobacteriacae kit (Hi-Media).
The paraffin blocks were sectioned into slices 5 pm in thickness, mounted onto slides and stained with hematoxylene and eosine. In the histological evaluation, general properties of the tissues, oedema, neovascularization and migration of inflammatory cells were evaluated semiquantitatively in the slides under a light microscope (Table II).
Les tumeurs du sac vitellin sont habituellement diagnostiquees au moyen d'une coloration a l'hematoxyline et a l'eosine des coupes tissulaires.
For confirmation positive tubes were streaked to Eosine Methylene Blue (EMB) plates.
The tissue specimens were placed in paraffin blocks, sectioned at 5 [mu]m, and stained with hematoxylene & eosine. The sections were blindly examined under light microscope by 2 investigators.