enzymolysis


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en·zy·mol·y·sis

(en'zi-mol'i-sis),
1. The splitting or cleavage of a substance into smaller parts by means of enzymatic action.
2. Lysis by the action of an enzyme.
[enzyme + G. lysis, dissolution]

en·zy·mol·y·sis

(en'zi-mol'i-sis)
1. The splitting or cleavage of a substance into smaller parts by means of enzymatic action.
2. Lysis by the action of an enzyme.
[enzyme + G. lysis, dissolution]

enzymolysis

(ĕn-zī-mŏl′ĭ-sĭs) [Gr. en, in, + zyme, leaven, + lysis, dissolution]
Chemical change or disintegration due to an enzyme.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, the extraction of the compounds from tissues requires complicated acidolysis, alkaline hydrolysis, or enzymolysis [3].
As compared to the control (without pretreatment followed by enzymolysis) the increase in DH was 27.95%, while the rate of increase in the ACE inhibitory activity was 39.08%.
The superabsorbent polymer based on cellulose has the advantages of high gel strength, low soluble component content, strong water retention ability, being biodegradable, and high enzymolysis resistance [14].
Natural: A feed or feed ingredient derived solely from plant, animal or mined sources, either in its unprocessed state or having been subject to physical processing, heat processing, rendering, purification, extraction, hydrolysis, enzymolysis or fermentation, but not having been produced by, or subject to, a chemically synthetic process and not containing any additives or processing aids that are chemically synthetic except in amounts as might occur in good manufacturing practices.
Different enzymolysis and osmotic pressure stabilizing agents along with different growth mediums, incubation periods, pH and temperature have been utilized for isolation and regeneration of protoplasts.
After trypsin enzymolysis for 3h, about 98% of the total collagen peptide was about the 4,000 Da.
First, the lactones can engender the complex reaction as oxidation and enzymolysis during SF.
[21] Mbofung CMF The effect of a traditional African method of meat processing on the availability of iron and other minerals from the finished product (Kilishi) following in vitro enzymolysis. In: Schlemer U (Ed) Bioavailability 93.
The official FDA definition of natural flavoring, as published in the Code of Federal Regulations (21CFR101.22), states: "Natural flavor, or natural flavoring, means the essential oil, oleoresin, essence or extract, protein hydrolysate, distillate or any product of heating roasting or enzymolysis, which contains the flavoring constituents derived from spice, fruit or fruit juice, vegetable or vegetable juice, root, leaf or similar plant material, meat, seafood, poultry, eggs, dairy products, or fermentation products thereof whose significant function is flavoring rather than nutritional."
The Federal Code of Regulations Section 101.22, defining natural flavorings, states that "natural flavoring" be applied to "the essential oil, oleoresin, essence or extractive, protein hydrolysate, distillate or any product of roasting, heating or enzymolysis which contains the flavoring constituents derived from a spice, fruit or fruit juice, vegetable or vegetable juice, edible yeast, herb, bark, root, leaf or similar plant material, meat, seafood, poultry, eggs, dairy products or fermentation products thereof whose significant function in food is flavoring rather than nutritional."
The Code of Federal Regulations defines a natural flavor as "the essential oil, oleoresin, essence or extractive, protein hydrosylate, distillate of any product of roasting, heating or enzymolysis, which contains the flavoring constituents derived from a spice, fruit juice, vegetable or vegetable juice, edible yeast, herb, bud, bark, root leaf or similar plant material, meat, seafood, poultry, eggs, dairy products, or fermentation products thereof whose significant function in food is imparting flavoring rather than nutrition."
Yu et al., "Heat and/or ultrasound pretreatments motivated enzymolysis of corn gluten meal: hydrolysis kinetics and protein structure," LWT-Food Science and Technology, vol.