enzymolysis


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en·zy·mol·y·sis

(en'zi-mol'i-sis),
1. The splitting or cleavage of a substance into smaller parts by means of enzymatic action.
2. Lysis by the action of an enzyme.
[enzyme + G. lysis, dissolution]

enzymolysis

[en′zīmol′isis]
Etymology: Gk, en, in, zyme, ferment, lysis, loosening
destruction or change of a substance caused by means of enzymatic action.

en·zy·mol·y·sis

(en'zi-mol'i-sis)
1. The splitting or cleavage of a substance into smaller parts by means of enzymatic action.
2. Lysis by the action of an enzyme.
[enzyme + G. lysis, dissolution]

enzymolysis

(ĕn-zī-mŏl′ĭ-sĭs) [Gr. en, in, + zyme, leaven, + lysis, dissolution]
Chemical change or disintegration due to an enzyme.
References in periodicals archive ?
8 mole L-1) as osmotic stabilizer and 240 min of enzymolysis time have supported 53.
Mycelia samples from each of the enzymolysis time periods (2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 h) were taken and filtered three times into new eppendorf tubes and centrifuged at 2200xg and 4degC for about 15 mins.
Shorter time enzymolysis time was observed to yield very small amounts, which are not separated from each other (Fig.
b) and (c) are figures indicating individual optimum number of individual protoplasts obtained as a result of 4 h enzymolysis time.
Effects of Enzymolysis Time on Protoplast Regeneration
The Code of Federal Regulations defines a natural flavor as "the essential oil, oleoresin, essence or extractive, protein hydrosylate, distillate of any product of roasting, heating or enzymolysis, which contains the flavoring constituents derived from a spice, fruit juice, vegetable or vegetable juice, edible yeast, herb, bud, bark, root leaf or similar plant material, meat, seafood, poultry, eggs, dairy products, or fermentation products thereof whose significant function in food is imparting flavoring rather than nutrition.
After freeze-drying, the spots were mixed with trypsin solution and then subjected to enzymolysis at 37[degrees]C in a water bath for 16 h.