environmental medicine


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Related to environmental medicine: Occupational and Environmental Medicine

environmental medicine

n.
The study of the effects of environmental exposure to synthetic chemicals on the immune system. Also called clinical ecology.

environmental medicine

a practice of medicine in which the major focus is on cause-and-effect relationships in health. Evaluations are made of such factors as eating and living habits and types of air breathed. Testing in the patient's own environment is performed to determine what precipitators are present that may be related to disease or other health problems. A treatment protocol is developed from this information.

environmental medicine

Fringe medicine
A field that explores the role of dietary and environmental allergens in health and illness. The intent of EM is to identify toxins in the environment through elimination diets, skin testing, provocation/ neutralisation testing, electroacupuncture, biofeedback, and radioallergosorbent testing, and to reduce patient exposure to noxious agents in the environment. Environmental medicine (EM) is believed by its practitioners (clinical ecologists) to address a wide range of conditions.
 
The concepts and practices of clinical ecology (environmental medicine) have been evaluated by several professional bodies, including the American Academy of Allergy and Immunology; all have concluded that environmental disease has not been proven to exist and that clinical ecology (environmental medicine) is not a valid discipline. Although there is little data to support the efficacy of EM in peer-reviewed journals, the concept that low levels of noxious components in the environment may cause disease has been attractive to some workers.

Diagnosis
Neutralisation, a test of uncertain validity which consists of either subdermal injection or sublingual placement of the allegedly offending substance and evaluating the reactions; some clinical ecologists identify offending substances by crystals, pendulums, galvanometers and other devices.
 
Disease managed by environmental medicine
• Allergies;
• Cardiovascular (angina, arrhythmia, thrombophlebitis, vasculitis);
• Paediatric (bedwetting, chronic otitis, learning disabilities);
• Endocrine (autoimmune thyroiditis, hypoglycaemia);
• ENT (allergies, sinus headaches, vertigo);
• Gastrointestinal (bloating, constipation, gastritis, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome);
• Gynaecologic (dyspareunia, premenstrual syndrome);
• Skin (angiooedema, eczema);
• Neuromuscular (epilepsy, headaches, migraines, myalgias);
• Psychiatric (anxiety, ADD/ADHD, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, sexual dysfunction);
• Rheumatic (rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus).

en·vi·ron·men·tal med·i·cine

(en-vī'rŏn-men'tăl med'i-sin)
That branch of health care involved with therapy of patients who are afflicted by causes related to the environment (e.g., duststorms, heat, overcrowding); also studies role of diet and environmental allergens on health and illness, among many other considerations.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is the role of environmental medicine to determine the true risk as it actually occurs in households.
It is our familiarity with the action of hyperdilute homeopathic medicines that makes environmental medicine seem so very plausible to us naturopaths.
The American Academy of Environmental Medicine trains physicians to assess all potential causes of ill health.
The study, whose results were published in the May 2007 issue of Environmental Health Perspectives, was a collaboration by researchers from the School of Public Health; the School of Medicine's Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma and Lung Biology; and the U.
Professor Jouni Jaakkola, director of Birmingham University's Institute for Environmental Medicine said: "Although the symptoms are not dangerous, they are unpleasant and disruptive for many people.
As it happens, this is what the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine did in its October 2002 study on risk assessments for mycotoxins in the indoor environment.
The research, published in the latest edition of the journal Occupational and Environmental Medicine, studied more than 1,400 children aged eight11 in 31 locations in the Tyrol, Austria.
1742-1749; Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 1999, Vol.
NORDIC BUSINESS REPORT-14 March 2001-New centre for arctic environmental medicine to open in Denmark(C)1994-2001 M2 COMMUNICATIONS LTD http://www.
Textbook of Clinical Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine planned to revise their Handbook of Occupational Medicine, but the result was so expanded and changed in scope that they decided to change the title.
Thanks to the vision, cooperative spirit, and hard work of ACAM, the American Academy of Environmental Medicine, The American Holistic Medicine Association, and the International College for Integrative Medicine, the iMosaic is the realization of that dream," said Kenneth A.

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