environmental carcinogen

environmental carcinogen

[envī′rənmen′təl]
any of the natural or synthetic substances that can cause cancer. Such agents may be divided into chemical agents, physical agents, hormones, and viruses. Some environmental carcinogens are arsenic, asbestos, uranium, vinyl chloride, ionizing radiation, ultraviolet rays, x-rays, and coal tar derivatives. Carcinogenic effects of chemicals may be delayed for as long as 30 years. Other carcinogens produce more immediate effects. Some studies indicate that the carcinogens in cigarette smoke are involved in 80% of all lung cancer. Most carcinogens are unreactive or secondary carcinogens but are converted to primary carcinogens in the body. Numerous factors, such as heredity, affect the susceptibilities of different individuals to cancer-causing agents.
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Moreover, the vine has been found to be an environmental carcinogen through the contamination of food supplies of farming villages in the Balkans, where Aristolochia grows wildly in the local wheat fields.
In the study, scientists exposed pregnant mice to a powerful environmental carcinogen called dibenzopyrene, one of a group of chemicals produced by cigarette smoking and also from burning organic material such as wood, coal, diesel fuel and cooking oil.
In addition, the consequences of environmental carcinogen or tobacco smoke exposure of mice during gestation that result in long lasting immune function deficiencies or inflammatory responses, in so far as they are related to the development of hematological malignancies, or cancers of the reproductive system, the brain/nervous system and/or the lung.
The NCI is further interested in the consequences of environmental carcinogen or tobacco smoke exposure of mice during gestation that result in long-lasting immune function deficiencies or inflammatory responses, insofar as they are related to the development of hematological malignancies or cancers of the reproductive system, the brain/central nervous system, and/or the lung.
The sprouts are high in sulforaphane, a compound that occurs in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables whose intake has been associated with protection against environmental carcinogens and several cancers.
Genetically engineering tumors in mice, a technique that has dominated cancer research for decades, may not replicate important features of cancers caused by exposure to environmental carcinogens, according to a new study led by UC San Francisco scientists.
Though it is not clear as to what may have caused cancer in the man, researchers believe it may have been due to genetic factors or due to environmental carcinogens like smoke from wood fires or from schistosomiasis, an infectious disease that is caused by parasites.
Pointing out that children are more susceptible than adults to the action of environmental carcinogens that induce DNA damage, the speaker observed that environmental factors play a major role in determining the health and well-being of children who comprise over one third of the world's population.
This study is significant because environmental carcinogens are often studied in breast milk as a surrogate for their presence in nonlactating breasts.
While few today would doubt the health risks of such personal lifestyle factors, the President's cancer panel nevertheless concluded that "the burgeoning number and complexity of known or suspected environmental carcinogens compel us to act to protect public health," and urged President Obama to use the power of his office to "remove the carcinogens and other toxins from our food, water and air that needlessly increase health care costs, cripple our nation's productivity, and devastate American lives.
The report cites progress in attacking tobacco, radiation exposure, environmental carcinogens, and infectious agents--which contribute to the 50% of cancers that are considered to be preventable.
Epstein, MD, a recognized authority on environmental carcinogens.

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