envy

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envy

 
a desire to have another's possessions or qualities for oneself.
penis envy in psychoanalysis, the concept that the female envies the male his possession of a penis, first described by Freud as occurring during the phallic stage in little girls as they become aware of anatomical differences between the sexes. It is often used more broadly for the women's generalized envy of men or their characteristics.

en·vy

(en'vē),
One's feeling of discontent or jealousy resulting from comparison with another person.

envy

/en·vy/ (en´ve) a desire to have another´s possessions or qualities for oneself.
penis envy  (en´ve) the concept that the female envies the male his possession of a penis or, more generally, any of his characteristics.

envy

Unhappiness about or the wish to possess qualities, physical attributes, or belongings of someone else.
References in periodicals archive ?
This was Sara's case as she observed and recognized envy and the resulting behaviors of both enviers and envied members in corporation V.
Figure 1 illustrates the emotion cycle of envy among the corporate entrepreneurs, their enviers, and the third-party observers.
The emotion cycle unfolds over time with the appraisal of the situation by the enviers and the display of their post-emotional behavior triggering (t1) a secondary appraisal process and post-emotional behavior for the envied corporate entrepreneurs (t2), resulting in the creation of a new situation that is observed by the top management (t3) influencing the cognition and behavior of the latter (t4) toward the entrepreneurial act.
In the "Verde" case program, all three envied members of the program recognized envy toward them, and they interpreted the post-emotional behavior of their enviers asa negative contributor to the program' s performance, perceiving the behavior and emotional reaction of their enviers as inappropriate.
The interaction rituals developed between the venturing programs members and their enviers generated a negative emotional energy or a "culture of envy" as expressed by one of the interviewees (Collins, 1990; Goss, 2005), which undermined the survivability of the programs.
Besides the methodological challenges in interviewing individuals who admit feeing envy (Stein, 1997), this begs for designing research projects that achieve high levels of trust to emerge over time between the researcher and the interviewees for the profiles of the enviers to be revealed and for these individuals to participate in the research inquiry.
In order to illustrate the article's proposition, we use the case of envy, a social emotion by nature, which presupposes social interaction and comparison between the envier and the envied.
In doing envy, the envier is reproducing that hierarchy and reaffirming the moral order.