envy

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Related to envied: envious

envy

 
a desire to have another's possessions or qualities for oneself.
penis envy in psychoanalysis, the concept that the female envies the male his possession of a penis, first described by Freud as occurring during the phallic stage in little girls as they become aware of anatomical differences between the sexes. It is often used more broadly for the women's generalized envy of men or their characteristics.

en·vy

(en'vē),
One's feeling of discontent or jealousy resulting from comparison with another person.

envy

/en·vy/ (en´ve) a desire to have another´s possessions or qualities for oneself.
penis envy  (en´ve) the concept that the female envies the male his possession of a penis or, more generally, any of his characteristics.

envy

Unhappiness about or the wish to possess qualities, physical attributes, or belongings of someone else.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fearing this stronger output envy, the envied may, therefore, be more likely to offer more help to his or her peers.
For the malicious envy group, malicious envy positively predicted prosocial behavior among the envied, and benign envy negatively predicted prosocial behavior among the envied.
Similarly, envy is linked to feelings of pleasure when the envied person suffers a setback, to a sense of justice relative to the disadvantaged position, even when the envy is subjective (Parks, Rumble, & Posey, 2002; Smith et al.
The former is characterized by the influence in upward motivation by increasing the desire to obtain what the envied person has, while the latter focus on lowering the envied person's status or position by denigrating the object of their envy and decreasing the advantage of the envied person.
development of complementary emotions, such as frustration and feeling envied and isolated, interpretation of envy as a threat and as a violation of organizational justice norms, social sharing between enviers and third-party individuals) used by the involved parties in recognizing and sharing emotions.
254) and envy occurs when "the thing one lacks is in a domain that is central to one's self-concept and the envious person perceives the envied personas similar to him or her" (Cohen-Charash & Mueller, 2007, p.
In another experiment, an experimenter dropped a bunch of erasers as the volunteer was leaving; those who thought they'd be maliciously envied were more likely to help him pick them up.
The author emphasizes that for the envier, envy is destructive until it is sublimated, and causes the envied to feel fearful and threatened.
The role of envy as a catalytic emotion suggests that envy in organizations might more generally lead to sensemaking that reframes the situation, to positive action which elevates the envier, or to negative action which brings down the envied person.
Because the advantage seems difficult to achieve with effort, malicious envy motivates the envier to diminish the envied rather than engage in self-improvement (Lange & Crusius, 2014; Rentzsch, Schroder-Abe, & Schutz, 2015).
A high standard attained by the envied person may initiate the achievement motive (McClelland, Atkinson, Clark, & Lowell, 1953), which is associated with risk-taking behavior (Atkinson, 1957).