envenomation


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envenomation

 [en-ven″o-ma´shun]

en·ven·om·a·tion

(en-ven'ō-mā'shŭn),
The act of injecting a poisonous material (venom) by sting, spine, bite, or other venom apparatus.

envenomation

/en·ven·om·a·tion/ (en-ven″o-ma´shun) poisoning by venom.

envenomation

(ĕn-vĕn′ə-mā′shən)
n.
The introduction of venom into a body by means of the bite or sting of a venomous animal.

envenomation

[enven′əmā′shən]
the injection of snake, arachnid, or insect venom into the body.

en·ven·om·a·tion

(en-ven'ŏ-mā'shŭn)
The act of injecting a poisonous material (venom) by sting, spine, bite, or other venom apparatus.

Envenomation

Exposure to venom by bites or stings from insects, reptiles, and fish.
Mentioned in: Wilderness Medicine

envenomation

the poisonous effects caused by the bites, stings or effluvia of insects and other arthropods, or the bites of snakes.
References in periodicals archive ?
20-minute whole blood clotting time was taken for monitoring and detecting coagulopathy and was found to be very reliable in correlation with the degree of envenomation.
The scorpion envenomation produced immediate transient hypotension, followed by hypertension and subsequently a progressive fall in MAP.
2,8] Berg adder envenomation causes a unique syndrome of cytotoxic and neurotoxic symptoms and signs.
Sixty percent of cases presented to emergency room with pain and tenderness in the bite site alone and rest of the cases with other signs of local envenomation.
Collected venom was freeze dried (lyophilized) using (Thermofreeze dryer PL-6000), and then stored at 2C to 7C in a light resistant container till LD50 calculation and envenomation.
The severity of envenomation varies according to the type of snake, the venom dose and the victim's general health.
Nineteen hours following envenomation, the blister was excised and the underlying dermis was described as erythematous and oozing serous fluid.
Of Australian snakebite fatalities, 60% are caused by brown snake envenomation (Isbister, 2006).
Data of patients was recorded for type of snake (as much as possible), site of snake bite, presence of fang marks, age and sex of the person bitten, date, time and place of bite, time taken by the victim to reach hospital, presence of symptoms and signs of envenomation in victim and type of treatment received before referral.
Among the topics are alcohol poisoning, bacterial tracheitis, cardiomyopathy, cyanide poisoning, elbow injuries, gastric outlet obstruction, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, lightning injuries, mitral valve prolapse, otologic trauma, pediatric pneumonia, reactive arthritis, snake envenomation, cutaneous tinea infections, and wound ballistics.