entropy

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entropy

 [en´trŏ-pe]
1. in thermodynamics, a measure of the part of the internal energy of a system that is unavailable to do work. In any spontaneous process, such as the flow of heat from a hot region to a cold region, entropy always increases.
2. the tendency of a system to move toward randomness.
3. in information theory, the negative of information, a measure of the disorder or randomness in a physical system. The theory of statistical mechanics proves that this concept is equivalent to entropy as defined in thermodynamics.
4. diminished capacity for spontaneous change, as occurs in the psyche in aging.

en·tro·py (S),

(en'trŏ-pē),
That fraction of heat (energy) content not available for the performance of work, usually because (in a chemical reaction) it has been used to increase the random motion of the atoms or molecules in the system; thus, entropy is a measure of randomness or disorder. Entropy occurs in the Gibbs free energy (G) equation: ΔG = ΔH - TΔSH, change in enthalpy or heat content; T, absolute temperature; ΔS, change in entropy; ΔG, change in Gibbs free energy).
See also: second law of thermodynamics.
[G. entropia, a turning toward]

en·tro·py

(S) (en'trŏ-pē)
That fraction of heat (energy) content not available for the performance of work, usually because (in a chemical reaction) it has been used to increase the random motion of the atoms or molecules in the system; thus, a measure of randomness or disorder.
[G. entropia, a turning toward]

entropy

the amount of disorder or the degree of randomness of a system. For example, when a protein is denatured by heat (see DENATURATION), the molecule (which has a definite shape) uncoils and takes up a random shape, producing a large change in entropy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on the Gabor histogram, the maximizing entropic criterion function is used to choose the optimal threshold.
and the entropic decay; and, "far-from-equilibrium situations [are]
Chakraborty, "Modified Hawking temperature and entropic force: a prescription in FRW model," Modern Physics Letters A, vol.
In [45, 46], the IGAC was employed to analyze the entropic dynamics on statistical manifolds induced by classical probability distributions commonly used in the investigation of regular and chaotic quantum energy level statistics.
It is also discovered that the graft copolymer has both energetic and entropic elasticity similar to the other common fillers, suggesting that graft copolymer could play a role as an organic filler for natural rubber when being applied by sinusoidal stress.
Additionally, only an entropic component [e.sub.i] meeting the criteria of [[lambda].sub.i] [not equal to] 0 and [1.sup.T][e.sub.i] [not equal to] 0 can contribute to the entropy estimate [21].
Living organisms are the least entropic (i.e., the most complexly ordered and improbable) entities known to exist [1,2].
It can be well understood that, with increasing [rho], entropic barrier for the chain translocation becomes greater; thus, the chain will be dragged back out of the channel if the electric field is weak, which led to the low success of translocation probability.
* Cause and Effect are Entropic measures and suitable special designed analytics is used for their exact assessment.
The implied total transaction value is approximately USD 287m and the implied enterprise value is USD 181m, net of Entropic's cash balance as of 31 December 2014.
The contract with Telefonica is the result of that effort," said Roger Gregory, vice president, Marketing at Entropic. "We are proud to call Telefonica a customer of our chipset solutions as they continue to innovate the way subscribers watch and engage with home entertainment content and services."
"By leveraging Entropic's c.LINK solution in both the STB and the broadband access infrastructure, subscribers are certain to get a faster, more exciting video viewing experience."